Education

Code Switch
11:43 am
Mon May 5, 2014

After Decades, A University By And For Latinos Will Shut Its Doors

The National Hispanic University sits in the shadow of the East San Jose foothills in a working-class Latino neighborhood.
Shereen Marisol Meraji

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 9:34 am

The National Hispanic University was created more than 30 years ago to educate first-generation college students from Latino backgrounds. Next year, the only school of its kind west of the Mississippi will close its doors.

NHU sits in the shadow of the East San Jose foothills in California's Silicon Valley. All the classrooms and faculty offices fit in one modern three-story building in the heart of a working-class Latino neighborhood. But the postwar elementary school right next door used to serve as the institution's hallowed halls.

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Paying For College
2:37 am
Thu April 24, 2014

When Money Trumps Need In College Admissions

For many low-income students, economic trends are making the prospect of getting into the college of their choice, and reaching graduation, even more difficult.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 11:51 am

At some schools, the admissions process itself can work against low-income students, according to Georgia Nugent, former president of Kenyon College and a senior fellow at the Council of Independent Colleges.

Nugent says during her tenure at Kenyon, there were low-income students at the bottom of the admissions list who sometimes weren't accepted so the school could make room for more affluent students.

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Education
3:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Who's Getting Preschool Right? Researchers Point To Tulsa

Preschool student Stormy Frazier watches a science experiment unfold in Nikki Jones' classroom in Tulsa, Okla. You can learn more about preschool in Tulsa here.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 5:38 pm

Many educators say quality early childhood education programs give young children a strong foundation for kindergarten and beyond.

But what does a high-quality preschool program look like? Early childhood education researchers point to Tulsa, Okla., as a school system that gets it right. NPR's education team went to Tulsa to find out what help sets the city's preschool program apart. You can read more about what they found — and visit a Tulsa preschool classroom, here.

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The Two-Way
7:23 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Texas Education Agency Considers Adding Class On Mexican-Americans

Supporters of a proposal to add a Mexican-American studies course as a statewide high school elective arrive for a Texas Board of Education hearing on Tuesday.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 6:33 pm

The Texas Board of Education heard testimony this afternoon about a proposed Mexican-American studies elective high school class that could be offered state wide.

As the AP reports, proponents of the of the program say it will offer students a deeper understanding of the state's history. The AP adds:

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Code Switch
3:05 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

For Latino Parents, Bilingual Classrooms Aren't Just About Language

This April 3, 2013 photo shows the inside of a classroom at Miami's Coral Way K-8 Center, the nation's largest bilingual school.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 4:41 pm

Right now, across the country, parents are in the midst of trying to get their children enrolled in bilingual classrooms for next September.

The motivation is usually straightforward. Parents want their kids to learn a foreign language. The thinking is that a second language will bring significant cultural and economic advantages.

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Paying For College
12:46 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Some Common Misconceptions About Paying For College

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 11:24 am

In reporting on students navigating the maze of college costs and financial aid, I kept running into misconceptions about paying for a degree. Here are some of the most common ones:

Low-income students get most of their college financial aid needs met and rich kids don't have to worry, so it's mainly the middle class that gets squeezed.

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Paying For College
4:24 am
Tue March 18, 2014

How The Cost Of College Went From Affordable To Sky-High

World War II veterans and other students at the University of Iowa in 1947. That year, due to federal assistance from the GI Bill, 60 percent of the school's enrollment was made up of veterans.
Margaret Bourke-White Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 12:59 pm

If you want to get an earful about paying for college, listen to parents from states where tuition and fees have skyrocketed in the last five years. In Arizona, for example, parents have seen a 77 percent increase in costs. In Georgia, it's 75 percent, and in Washington state, 70 percent.

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Code Switch
9:27 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Hispanics Struggle To Graduate: An Issue of School Choice?

Hispanics are less likely than other groups to enroll in four-year schools. They're also harder to find in stock photos.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Mon March 3, 2014 7:59 pm

Angela Barba was the first in her immediate family to graduate from high school. And when the time came for her son Robert to follow in her footsteps, she says, she found herself overwhelmed.

"I had no idea how I was going to get him into college," she says.

Angela, who had completed a two-year degree herself, says she wanted her son to be the first in the family to complete a four-year program. But she couldn't really offer any advice or guidance as to what schools to attend or how to apply for scholarships.

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The Source - February 24, 2014
9:24 am
Mon February 24, 2014

The Source: Massive, Intelligent & Free: MOOCs And Education

edX is one MOOC provider along with Coursera.

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) being offered for free by the nation's best universities were going to change everything about education. The most prestigious institutions in America threw open their doors to the masses. Millions of people poured in, taking everything from computer science to "The Greatest Unsolved Mysteries of the Universe." 

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Higher Education
11:44 am
Thu February 6, 2014

State Launches Affordable College Degree Program For Half The Cost

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has launched a new degree program aimed at making college affordable.

The Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Degree Program has been in the works since it’s conception in 2011 when it was one of the needs Gov. Rick Perry expressed during his State of the State Address. The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board announced they had finished designing that program this week.  

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