State Asks Supreme Court to Drop School Finance Lawsuit

Sep 1, 2015
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“Money isn’t pixie dust” when it comes to improving public schools, lawyers for the state of Texas told the state Supreme Court on Tuesday, arguing an appeal in what has been described as the most far-reaching school finance case in state history. They urged the high court to either dismiss or remand the lawsuit brought four years ago by nearly two-thirds of the state's school districts.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

While some young men are shown to lose interest in school early, the San Antonio Independent School District is gathering boys as early as 4th grade for a new experience to hopefully keep them engaged before the urge to drop out arises.  And on Monday, Bexar County’s only all-male public school opened its doors for the first time. 

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Last year the San Antonio Independent School District along with 8 other education outlets was awarded half a million dollars from the U.S. Department of Education's Full Service Community Schools program to turn Wheatley Middle School into a hub of community activity with substantial resources for students and their parents. Job-skills training, socio-emotional well-being options, after-school academic programs, and more are slated to begin this Saturday when the school celebrates a grand reopening. 

Both houses of Congress have now passed versions of the bill that would update the largest federal education law, known as No Child Left Behind, for the first time since 2001. They are big, meaty and complicated, and now they have to be reconciled into one messy Dagwood sandwich of a bill to go to the president.

A federal report out today reinforces the notion that when it comes to state standards, proficiency is still in the eye of the beholder.

A top-scoring student on Arizona's reading test may fall far below average in states with more rigorous exams, like Massachusetts or Wisconsin.