Education

Courtesy SAISD

The San Antonio Independent School District is preparing to make an offer to one of two finalists for the job as the new superintendent.

The SAISD Board of Trustees announced at its April 13 meeting that it had narrowed the field to two candidates: Pedro Martinez, Superintendent in Residence for the Nevada Dept. of Education; and Dr. Scott Muri, Deputy Superintendent of Academics for Fulton County Schools in Atlanta.

Martinez and Muri were to come back this week, each to have a one-day series of information meetings with stakeholders. 

But Board President Ed Garza told reporters Tuesday he had received a letter from Muri  saying he had been selected as a finalist in another district and asked that his name be withdrawn from the process. The Wednesday night information meeting with Muri was canceled. 

“This was an aggressive and thorough search process that started with more than 40 possible candidates,” said Garza.

GALVESTON — A Texas A&M Galveston professor has failed every student in his strategic management class, berating them via email as a disgrace to the school.

KPRC television station in Houston reports that Irwin Horwitz sent the email Thursday informing them of their failing grades and saying he’ll no longer teach the class.

The email said he’s reached “breaking point.” Horwitz accused the students of backstabbing and cheating, and said they lack maturity.

Much of our recent reporting, especially from New Orleans, has focused on young people who are neither in school nor working. There are an estimated 5 1/2 million of them, ages 16 to 24, in the United States.

The long-running story of the for-profit Corinthian Colleges has entered what looks like a final phase. As our colleagues at SCPR wrote:

"Corinthian Colleges will shut down all of its remaining 28 ground campuses, displacing about 16,000 students, less than two weeks after the U.S. Department of Education announced it was fining the for-profit institution $30 million for misrepresentation."

Shanna Peeples On Twitter

LUBBOCK — A high school English teacher in Texas who works with students facing poverty and traumas related to their immigration to the United States on Monday was named the 2015 National Teacher of the Year.

Shanna Peeples from Amarillo was selected for the honor by the Council of Chief State School Officers. She is the first Texas teacher to win the award since 1957.

Peeples works at Palo Duro High, where about 85 percent of students live below the poverty line and where more refugee children are enrolled than in any other high school in the 31,000-student district. She will be recognized by President Barack Obama in a ceremony at the White House on Wednesday.

Peeples said a childhood that exposed her to alcoholism and domestic violence has provided her with empathy for students from Burma, Somalia, Ethiopia, Iraq and Cuba, many of who are survivors of emotional or physical trauma in their war-torn homelands. That can make trust difficult, she said.

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