Education

Texas Public Radio

AUSTIN — State senators are debating a contentious plan to repeal a Texas law granting in-state public university tuition to the children of some people in the United States illegally.

Democrats and Hispanic groups champion the law, while Republicans in the GOP-controlled Legislature have pledged to end it quickly. On Monday, the two sides clashed during a Senate subcommittee on border security meeting.

Sen. Donna Campbell defended her bill repealing the so-called “Texas DREAM Act.”

Credit: Wikicommons http://bit.ly/1CPNiYT

The latest effort to improve Texas education involves vouchers. Instead of being confined by zip codes, families could elect to send their children to private and specialty schools, and the dollars allocated to students follow them. 

While this plan would allow students to choose schools based on individual needs rather than their addresses, critics point out that vouchers may create more disparity.

AUSTIN — A Senate subcommittee has pushed back for a week debate on scraping a law that grants in-state public university tuition to the children of some people in the United States illegally.

Texas Democrats and Hispanic advocacy groups champion the law, while top Republicans have pledged to repeal it. The two sides were to begin their clash Monday, but a border security hearing was delayed until April 7.

AUSTIN — Over the past two decades, Texas agencies have spent at least $30 million on tuition payment programs for state workers in a program with lax rules and oversight, according to a newspaper review of payment records and policies.

Of the three rules governing the payment of tuitions — which include requiring agencies adopt a policy regarding recipient eligibility, put payments toward education programs related to job duties and prohibit agencies from paying in advance of six weeks before classes begin — all may have been violated, the Houston Chronicle reported.

Dan Patrick via YouTube

AUSTIN — A Texas Senate education panel is considering a sweeping but divisive voucher plan that would let families get state funding to send their children to private and religious schools.

The proposal championed by Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and Senate Education Committee Chairman Larry Taylor promotes what they call “school choice” by letting parents remove students from struggling public schools.

The plan will be heard Thursday in Taylor’s committee, which is likely to eventually approve it to the full Senate.

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