Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio.

Let's say you have invites to two parties that advertise "free drinks!"

At the first party, there's simply an open bar. At the second party, though, you have to bring in your tax return, fill out a long form, and register to receive a cocktail grant in a given amount based on your annual income.

Once those funds are drained, you can then become eligible for vouchers to pay for further beverages up to a predetermined limit.

Which party sounds like more fun? Which will be better attended? And which one is likely to be more expensive for the hosts?

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Students in the Edgewood Independent School District on the city's West Side are in a unique situation as kids head back to school this week. The district is now being managed by a state-appointed board of managers and a state-appointed superintendent. After a year of uncertainty some parents believe state intervention is exactly what was needed.

 

Edgewood ISD Superintendent Sylvester Perez greets rain-soaked parents, staff and students at Winston Elementary School with a smile. It’s his tradition to ride a school bus on the first day of class.

 

Native American students make up only 1.1 percent of the nation's high school population. And in college, the number is even smaller. More than any other ethnic or racial group, they're the least likely to have access to college prep or advanced placement courses. Many get little or no college counseling at all. In 1998, College Horizons, a small nonprofit based in New Mexico, set out to change that through five-day summer workshops on admissions, financial aid and the unique challenges they'll face on campus.

From Texas Standard:

Every year thousands of veterans benefit from the so-called post-9/11 GI bill, which pays for tuition to help vets afford college.

The original GI bill was credited with lifting many families into the middle class after World War II. Texas has a similar version of the bill, called the Hazlewood Act and the Texas Comptroller – Glenn Hegar, the man with the state's check book – says the act is too pricey.

The act goes back to 1943 and Hegar says three factors have contributed to the rise in expenses in providing this service to Texans.

 


AARON SCHRANK/TPR

University of Texas at San Antonio senior Andrew Willis usually has his small caliber pistol on him a few times a week. 

“It’s mostly just if I’m going to be in a part of town that is a little more shady,” says Willis. “It’s the same premise as, you know, wearing your seatbelt, taking vitamins or having health insurance. You’d rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.”

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