Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio.

Acting U.S. Education Secretary John B. King Jr. wants states and districts to focus on streamlined, higher-quality tests in a broader effort to win back some classroom time.

And here's the kicker: The feds will actually pay for (some of) the transition.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

To bring more young men of color into the teaching workforce, Toyota Motor Manufacturing Texas and the City’s MLK Commission are creating two scholarships for students at Texas A&M San Antonio.  

The two scholarships are a result of the city’s commitment to President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative.  My Brother’s Keeper aims to connect men of color to role models and opportunities. District 2 City Councilman Alan Warrick says both scholarships will make it possible for men of color to become teachers.

From Texas Standard:

Who would have thought that in the annals of the dull, ordinary and all-too-predictable layout of the modern office cubicle, there’d be a development that captured pretty much everyone’s imagination? Standing desks – it seems like everyone glued to a cubicle wants one. In many office settings, people while away their days sitting and, let’s face it, snacking.

 


"What are some of the things that the monsters like to eat in this story?" teacher Marisa McGee asks a trio of girls sitting at her table.

McGee teaches kindergarten at Walker Jones Elementary in Washington, D.C. Today's lesson: a close reading of the book What Do Monsters Eat?

"They like to eat cake," says one girl.

"I noticed you answered in a complete sentence," McGee says. "Can you tell me something else?"

"Stinky socks!"

We often hear about school districts that struggle with high poverty, low test scores and budget problems. But one district has faced all of these and achieved remarkable results.

In just over three years, Superintendent Tiffany Anderson, who oversees the Jennings School District in Jennings, a small city just outside St. Louis, has led a dramatic turnaround in one of the worst-performing systems in Missouri.

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