Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio.

This winter, Jameria Miller would often run to her high school Spanish class, though not to get a good seat.

She wanted a good blanket.

"The cold is definitely a distraction," Jameria says of her classroom's uninsulated, metal walls.

Her teacher provided the blankets. First come, first served. Such is life in the William Penn School District in an inner-ring suburb of Philadelphia.

The hardest part for Jameria, though, isn't the cold. It's knowing that other schools aren't like this.

Nathan Cone / TPR

Local and state leaders in education met at the Pearl Stable in San Antonio on Thursday, April 21 for a forum on educational initiatives, issues and the quest for student success in the San Antonio area. The sold-out event was hosted by the San Antonio Area Foundation and the San Antonio Clean Technology Forum.

In public radio's mythical Lake Wobegon, "all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average."

The first two conditions are merely unlikely. The third one is a mathematical absurdity. However, a new survey suggests that almost all parents believe it to be true.

In a recent survey of public school parents, 90 percent stated that their children were performing on or above grade level in both math and reading. Parents held fast to this sunny belief no matter their own income, education level, race or ethnicity.

In 1973, in a 5-4 ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court decided that there was no federal right to equal school funding in the Constitution.

That was more than 40 years ago, and today Patty Rodriguez, a teacher in the same school district in San Antonio where that fight started, says nothing has changed.

Her father, Demetrio Rodriguez, filed the suit. It became a landmark case, a turning point when the focus around school funding shifted from the federal government to the states.

For generations, school kids had lockers. But in Texas, some schools are no longer assigning them. Only two students out of 2,700 at a high school in Austin asked for lockers this year. The rest were wired shut. Some students don’t need lockers, because they rely on laptops rather than textbooks. Security concerns are another reasons lockers aren’t being used. Kate McGee from Here & Now contributor KUT reports.

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