Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio.

If you've followed education in the news or at the book store in the past couple of years, chances are you've heard of "grit." It's often defined as the ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal.

Part of our series of conversations with leading teachers, thinkers and activists on education issues

Jordan Shapiro's recent post in Forbes in which he laid out four misconceptions about the future of education, caught my attention because, like much of his work, he tries to take a cattle prod to the conventional education narrative.

USDA http://bit.ly/1zWcgGZ

According to a new Frontline Special "The Trouble With Chicken," the U.S. poultry industry is pumping out birds with more and stronger strains of bacteria like Salmonella.

Chicken is the most popular protein in the United States and the drive to sustain a hungry market while keeping costs low means small animal enclosures and the use of antibiotics. More antibiotics are sold for animal use than human use in this country. 

Joey Palacios / TPR News

AUSTIN — Republican Gov. Greg Abbott has signed a bill that would allow Texas high school students to fail two high-stakes exams and still graduate. It is effective immediately.

Abbott said Monday that the state “must protect” students from what he called evolving testing standards. “While it is critical that the state appropriately holds public schools and districts accountable for delivering the best possible education, we must protect Texas students from being penalized as a result of evolving testing standards,” he said in a statement. 

About 28,000 students in the class of 2015 still must pass one or more of the five state exams in U.S. history, biology, algebra I, English I and English II required to graduate. Of those who need to retake exams, about half must retake more than one.

Clemed / CC

AUSTIN — The Texas Senate has voted to allow home school students to participate in public school athletics and extracurricular activities statewide — advancing the so-called “Tim Tebow bill.”

Plano Republican Sen. Van Taylor's proposal sanctions home school participation in University Interscholastic League events, which are currently only open to public school students.

Monday’s Senate approval sends the measure to the House. It’s similar to legislation that has advanced in other states.

Supporters point to Tebow, who played high school football in Florida while being home-schooled. He later won the Heisman Trophy at the University of Florida.

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick oversees the Senate and has likened expanding UIL participation to the 1960s civil rights movement.

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