Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio.

AARON SCHRANK/TPR

University of Texas at San Antonio senior Andrew Willis usually has his small caliber pistol on him a few times a week. 

“It’s mostly just if I’m going to be in a part of town that is a little more shady,” says Willis. “It’s the same premise as, you know, wearing your seatbelt, taking vitamins or having health insurance. You’d rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.”

The school district of Freehold Borough, N.J., has a 32 percent poverty rate. It is fully surrounded by another school district, Freehold Township, which has a 5 percent poverty rate.

AARON SCHRANK/TPR

Cynthia Barton is the dietitian for the Northside Independent School District—San Antonio’s largest. She's one of 7,000 school lunch professionals who were in San Antonio this week for the School Nutrition Association's annual conference. 

“I’ve been with Northside for 24 years, so I’ve seen a lot of change,” Barton says. 

One of the biggest changes was the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act—new federal nutrition standards mandating healthier school lunches. It meant more grains and veggies and fewer calories on the school lunch menus.

Around the country, many historically black colleges and universities are struggling with financial problems and falling enrollment. So some are turning to a new and unexpected pool of potential students: Latinos.

Laura Isensee of Here & Now contributor Houston Public Media reports.

A new report, out today, provides 186 pages of answers to one of the toughest questions in education:

What does it take to get preschool right?

Parents and politicians alike want to know. States are spending roughly $7 billion this year on early childhood education, despite the fact that there are more cautionary tales — like this one from Tennessee — than success stories.

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