Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio.

Clemed / CC

AUSTIN — The Texas Senate has voted to allow home school students to participate in public school athletics and extracurricular activities statewide — advancing the so-called “Tim Tebow bill.”

Plano Republican Sen. Van Taylor's proposal sanctions home school participation in University Interscholastic League events, which are currently only open to public school students.

Monday’s Senate approval sends the measure to the House. It’s similar to legislation that has advanced in other states.

Supporters point to Tebow, who played high school football in Florida while being home-schooled. He later won the Heisman Trophy at the University of Florida.

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick oversees the Senate and has likened expanding UIL participation to the 1960s civil rights movement.

Are you a glass half-full kind of person? Or glass half-empty?

Depending on your answer, you'll find the new report on state-funded preschool programs from the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) at Rutgers University either delightfully encouraging or downright depressing.

For example, glass half-full: Pre-K enrollment is up!

Glass half-empty: It's still pretty low.

The Best Commencement Speeches, Ever

May 11, 2015

It's getting to be that time of the year when students wipe tears from watery eyes, exchange final goodbyes and throw their graduation caps into the sky. In other words, it's graduation season — and that also means the season of commencement speeches.

AUSTIN — The Texas House has approved a potentially landmark measure to stop charging students who skip school with a criminal offense.

Houston Democratic Rep. Harold Dutton’s bill passed on a voice vote Friday and now needs only a final procedural vote to clear the House. A similar measure already passed the Senate, but the bills are different and each would have to pass the opposite chamber before becoming law.

In fiscal year 2014, nearly 100,000 Texas students received misdemeanors for too many unexcused absences.

Joey Palacios / TPR News

AUSTIN — After months of criticism from both sides of the political spectrum, the Texas Senate on Thursday approved Republican Gov. Greg Abbott’s proposed pre-K upgrade — a plan that Tea Party activists condemn as socialist and educators tepidly embrace as better than nothing.

Abbott doesn’t get to sign his first flagship education initiative quite yet. But with the House only needing to agree to some minor tweaks, he is now poised to deliver a major campaign promise before the Legislature adjourns June 1.

Not everyone will enthusiastically celebrate.

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