Energy

EPA

Newly proposed Environmental Protection Agency rules for existing coal-fired power plants have several state and federal officials up in arms over the possible economic impact for Texas businesses.

This year the EPA plans to implement rules on existing coal-fired power plants, which will have three years to fix and update their facilities or face hefty fines.

Louise Vest (Flikr.com User: OneEighteen)

The Environmental Protection Agency today announced it wants a 30 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. The draft rule announced in a press conference is the largest cut ever asked for on power plants. 

Jason Lewis / U.S. Department of Energy

Fronteras: The Democrat facing newly-nominated Republican Dan Patrick in the Texas lieutenant governor race says Sen. Patrick’s pledge to campaign in the minority community is “insulting.” New EPA rules to cut carbon emissions are expected to be unveiled soon. The new rules are expected to spur the use of a so-called clean coal technology. There are fewer than 100 fluent speakers of Kumeyaay left in Southern California and northern Baja California, where they once dominated. Efforts are now underway to preserve the endangered language.

Texas Office of Public Utility Counsel

A report released by the Energy Reliability Council of Texas shows the state is not in any danger of rolling blackouts anytime in the near future.  

ERCOT released three assessment reports looking at whether the state has enough energy reserves to meet the peak demand during the summer and fall of 2014 and then a long-term review of peak customer demand.

Warren Lasher, ERCOT’s director of system planning, said a set of new projects will help Texas meet its energy demand.

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Leaders in the field of electric reliability are talking about peak seasons ahead of summer since demand is always a hot topic around this time of year.

But as Texas increases generation of power with wind and solar resources, CPS Energy CEO Doyle Beneby thinks electric reliability is sufficient ahead of what could be a brutally hot summer.

He wants to focus on how to make it stay that way for the long run, though.

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