Ethics

EdTech Stanford School of Medicine

Doctors are facing a marketplace that demands they think about many things before the patient. That's according to a new book by Dr. Jack Cochran, executive director of the Permanente Federation and author Charles Kenney called "The Doctor Crisis: How Physicians Can and Must Lead the Way to Better Health Care."

Cochran argues it has never been less fulfilling emotionally and professionally than today to be a doctor. This assumes a doctor was inspired to join the field to help people and not just to make money. 

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Should the State of Texas be able to track contributions from 501 (c) (4) political nonprofits? This week a select committee of House lawmakers will discuss the possibility of legislation that could track this political "dark money" ahead of the 2015 session.

Flickr user 401(K) 2012 / cc

  Washington, D.C., has seen a drop in the number of registered lobbyists and in dollars spent on lobbying since 2008.

But before you break out the champagne to celebrate the end of influence-peddling, hear this: 46 percent of those former lobbyists in 2012 were still employed by the same firms, doing very similar jobs, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. 

The Texas Ethics Commission has approved a rulemaking request on "dark money" disclosure from an Austin lobbyist.

Austin lobbyist Steve Bresnen, along with a political watchdog group, are taking a back-door approach to creating a rule that would reveal all of the money that is used to influence elected officials and their decisions.

EdTech Stanford School of Medicine

Marlise Munoz was a 33-year-old paramedic from Fort Worth who was 14 weeks pregnant when a pulmonary embolism left her brain dead in November of last year. Jahi McMath was a 13-year-old Oakland teenager when complications from a tonsillectomy left her brain dead in December. It is at this point that the similarities diverge.

McMath's family is battling the hospital to keep the girl on life support, with a respirator and being fed intravenously. Doctors have been vilified in the case as unfeeling as they try to convince the family there is no chance of recovery.

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