In 1962, a Syrian-born Hollywood filmmaker named Moustapha Akkad watched the epic film Lawrence of Arabia, directed by David Lean. Akkad was riveted as he watched a scene in which actor Omar Sharif emerges from the sands like a wraith on horseback — an Arab screen hero.

This Time Out, Matt Damon's Not Feeling The 'Bourne'

Jul 28, 2016

Once upon a time, a hugely successful spy franchise lost its star. A more affordable, less charismatic actor was secured for one underperforming installment before the original guy was coaxed back for a much-ballyhooed homecoming sequel set largely in Las Vegas.

Susan Ranjel

San Antonio's biggest film festival is well underway. Its director is  Teacher/Film Maker/Entrepreneur Adam Rocha.

"This is a full throttle film festival. We're being recognized worldwide."

This is the 22nd time that Rocha has cranked up the San Antonio Film Festival machine.   

"There are 145 films from around the world, 29 San Antonio Film Makers.  We have Hell or High Water. That's their very first world premier and we're very excited by that." 

Even if you are a serious person with adult responsibilities, you are likely aware that a new incarnation of Ghostbusters arrives in theaters this week. It stars four funny women and was co-written by a fifth, and at least some proportion of its intended audience has found these staffing decisions alarming. While I haven't seen it yet, Ghostbusters '16 is by most accounts neither a feminist battle cry nor a cynically made disaster, but a light midsummer amusement.

Actress Olivia de Havilland, the last surviving star of the most popular film of all time, retired from showbiz decades ago, apparently feeling that 49 films, two best actress Oscars, and a best-selling memoir were accomplishment enough for one career.

Friday in Paris, she celebrates her 100th birthday, which seems a good moment to reflect on the mix of sparkle and resilience that marked her public life.