Film

Georgia’s $2 billion film industry has put Atlanta on the map as the Hollywood of the South, or has some describe it, “Y’allywood.” Accordingly, there’s a greater demand there for actors, producers, technicians and stunt people.

This year, a veteran stunt driver opened up a school for aspiring stunt drivers in Georgia.

Taylor Gantt and Sean Powers, reporters with Here & Now contributor Georgia Public Broadcasting, recently visited the school for a crash course in stunt driving.

When did our expectations for Tim Burton movies sink so precipitously? We ought to be able to forgive the guy who made Ed Wood and Sleepy Hollow a Planet of the Apes now and then. Or even an Alice in Wonderland, so long as he keeps balancing mega-grossing mediocrities like that with heartfelt stuff like Frankenweenie, his delightful stop-motion ode to his dog. Any director who averages a studio feature every other year for three decades will have a stinker or two on his resume.

The new movie Queen of Katwe has a familiar theme: It's the real-life story of a girl from the slums who discovers an unlikely talent (chess) and becomes an unlikely champion. But in other ways, the film is revolutionary: It may be the first time a major studio (Disney) has set a movie in Africa with all black actors and no animals.

Even 60 years ago, there were westerns that interrogated the genre's veneration of masculinity and might-for-right.

The Magnificent Seven wasn't one of them.

After the disaster that was 2004's Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, Bridget's hot mess of a life lands safely back in the spry hands of Sharon Maguire. Maguire, reportedly the model for Bridget's fizzy friend Shazzer, directs this new sequel with the same antic flair she brought to Bridget Jones's Diary when the novel-based franchise began in 2001. That film earned many detractors on many grounds, and Bridget Jones's Baby will too.

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