flooding

San Antonio River Authority

It was one year ago last weekend that torrential rains flooded much of Central and South San Antonio. The storms killed three, stranded dozens, left thousands without power and displaced more than two dozen families on the San Antonio River.

A year after the devastation, many of those residents have now moved away from the only home their families had known for more than 100 years.

Homeowners near the Espada Mission said they had never seen nine feet of water before, but the water rose within an hour, and 27 families lost everything.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

The San Antonio River Authority has begun a process to clean up trash and debris that end up in Olmos Basin. Officials are working on a project to remove much of the trash dumped in far northwest Bexar County before it winds up in the San Antonio River.

Local residents offered their input at a recent SARA event, pointing out hotspots where they’ve seen trash collecting along tributaries that run into Olmos Basin.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

Former District 9 City Councilwoman Elisa Chan has just wrapped up her campaign for state senator. She resigned last year from city council to run against state Rep. Donna Campbell, hoping at least to take Campbell to a runoff.

Her second place finish means she's done with politics, at least for now. But some people in her former city council district say she has unfinished business from her elected office: A project involving Mud Creek.

www.bexarfloodcontrol.org

A major flood control project kicks off on the city’s Northwest Side this week.

Work is set to begin on the $15 million Huebner Creek – Segment 2 Flood Control Project that will ultimately take nearly 100 homes out of the flood plain.

Bexar County Flood Control Program Director Bobby Mengden said the City of San Antonio contributed $1 million for a 1.25 mile hike-and-bike trail along the creek.

San Antonio River Authority

It’s been more than two months since the flood, and the process of recovery in the Espada area is moving forward slowly. The San Antonio River Authority has offered residents a few options, but so far no action has been taken.

SARA is offering Espada residents three options: A direct buyout, an option to remain on the property and rebuild their homes to flood standards, or Bexar County will buy a flood easement where owners would retain their property for agricultural purposes but live elsewhere.

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