flooding

Parts of Texas have barely had time to recover from the last round of flooding rains, but the National Weather Service is warning that there's more to come this week.

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  This week on Fronteras:

--Texas spends millions on border security but wants the Obama administration to pay for it.

--Texas farmers survived the drought.  Now they’re working to survive recent flooding.

--Water problems also are plaguing New Mexico where runoff from the storms is polluting the Rio Grande.

--A Fort Worth organization is helping young people recover from the financial consequences of gang life.

--An Austin mother in public housing is struggling to keep her son in one school. 

Courtesy: The Texas Department of Transportation / via Facebook

SAN MARCOS — Recordings of 911 calls reveal frantic requests for help from people staying in homes along the flooded Blanco River in Central Texas, including a woman who said the house she was in was “floating.”

Hays County released the recordings Tuesday to the Austin American-Statesman. The calls came in over Memorial Day weekend, when the area saw heavy rains and massive flooding. Nine bodies have been recovered in Hays County. The victims include Laura McComb, 34, who called to report water was creeping higher and there was no way to escape.

“We are on the Blanco River in Wimberley, and the water is up to the second story into the house,” McComb said. “It’s coming up to the second floor. I mean it’s so high up. And we have no exit out.”

Today, nearly two weeks after the catastrophic Memorial Day floods in Texas, search crews are still combing the banks of the Blanco River looking for three people who remain missing. They've already found eight bodies.

Meanwhile, residents of the tourist and retirement town of Wimberley, Texas, hit hardest by the flood, are cleaning up and struggling to reclaim their lives.

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