food

courtesy Lebanese Food Festival

An upcoming festival provides a tasty at a place you might never have been.  It's one of the few places you can go where you'll see the Lebanese and U.S. flags flying side by side.

At the end of the month Father Charles Khachan, the pastor of St. George Maronite Church, and his parishioners are putting on their annual Lebanese Food Festival.

"It's a show of culture, through food, music, dance, Lebanese wine and Lebanese beer," Khachan says.

Norma Martinez

What could be more Texan than Tacos? Tacos are a favorite food but where are the best tacos?

And how did tacos become a culinary super star that it is today?

Certainly this wasn't always the case. For generations tacos were considered a food of the underclass and not appropriate for polite society.

But tacos have arrived.

Mando Reyo calls himself a taco journalist and with Jarod Neece has written the book “The Tacos of Texas.”


They call it "The Hummus Wars."

Lebanon accused the Israeli people of trying to steal hummus and make it their national dish, explains Ronit Vered, a food journalist with the newspaper Haaretz in Tel Aviv. And so hummus became a symbol, she tells us, "a symbol of all the tension in the Middle East."

The war began over a 4,532-pound plate of hummus.

Be it SpongeBob SquarePants or Tony the Tiger, food companies have long used cartoon characters to market their products to children. But that tactic can also sway younger kids to eat fresh vegetables, according to a new study.

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

Jun 29, 2016

For the past few years, my friends and I have noticed two trends when dining. First, seemingly every high-end menu rebukes factory farming with an essay about locally sourced pork belly, and second, just about every one of these restaurants looks so much like a factory — with exposed light bulbs, steel details and brick walls — that I'm constantly looking over my shoulder for the foreman.

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