food

Nan Palmero http://bit.ly/11HPx1K

With the Culinary Institute of America training chefs, regular appearances in the James Beard nominations and semifinalists, and blossoming restaurant and food truck scene, is San Antonio a culinary hot spot?

Can a town known for its breakfast tacos and other TexMex break out of its own stereotypes?

Guests:

  • Chad Carey, Chef and Restaurateur who co-owns Hot Joy, Barbaro, The Monterey and more. 
  • Angela Covo, editor-in-chief for Edible San Antonio Magazine

Recently, a friend and I rode bicycles from Brownsville, Texas, to Oklahoma, 738 miles from the Rio Grande to the Red River, just for the hell of it. Naturally, eating was the highlight of the journey. The trip turned into a 13-mph tour of Texas's evolving food geography.

For many of us, chicken soup can soothe the soul and mac and cheese can erase a bad day. We eat chocolate when we feel gloomy, or when we've been in the presence of a Dementor. And we eat chocolate ice cream to help us get over a bad breakup.

As you may have heard, America's diplomats are struggling these days with a few distracting and unpleasant events in far-off parts of the world. But they're rising to the challenge: They're sending in the chefs.

The U.S. State Department launched a Diplomatic Culinary Partnership two years ago in order to "elevate the role of culinary engagement in America's formal and public diplomacy efforts." Some of the country's most renowned chefs have volunteered to help out, joining the department's "Chef Corps."

In many communities, the local school district is the largest food provider, filling thousands of hungry bellies every day. But trying to feed healthful food to some of the pickiest eaters can result in mountains of wasted food.

Now, many schools are finding that giving kids a say in what they eat can cut down on what ends up in the trash.

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