fracking

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Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Ryan E. Poppe

Texas-Mexico relations were front and center this as Governor Greg Abbott met with Mexico’s Foreign Secretary. Former-U.S. ambassador to Mexico Tony Garza says improving these ties will greatly serve Texas businesses and the state.

After serving as Texas Secretary of State and US ambassador to Mexico under George W. Bush, Garza went on to represent companies that have clients in Mexico and says a reform of the country’s energy sector has made it a place ripe with opportunity, especially for Texas companies wanting to help extract the country’s enormous oil reserves.

While most of the attention on the impacts of fracking has focused on things like drinking water, air pollution and earthquakes, state regulators in Pennsylvania are working on another less-discussed, but no less serious, side effect of oil and gas development: forest fragmentation.

When Denton, Texas, voted to ban fracking in the town last year, the state’s oil and gas industry jumped into high gear. The day after the vote, the industry and the state filed lawsuits against Denton. The Texas legislature also passed legislation that stops local governments from regulating most drilling. From Here & Now contributing station KUT, Mose Buchele explains how this “ban on the ban” came about and why Denton just overturned its fracking ban.

From Texas Standard:

The Environmental Protection Agency recently concluded that contamination of drinking water from fracking isn’t as widespread as previously feared. But is the panic over water contamination a thing of the past? A new study is re-igniting the fears of some.

The recent study checked the water quality at 550 wells across 13 Texas counties along the Barnett Shale. It’s one of the largest independent surveys on water near fracking sites ever conducted in the U.S., and the conclusions are alarming.

The Barnett Shale, a gas reservoir located near the Dallas-Forth Worth area, spans at least 17 counties. It’s believed to have more usable natural gas than any onshore oil field in the country. But the shale in the area has a reputation for being naturally hard to drill into, so it was largely untapped — until hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, came along.

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