George W. Bush

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Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

President George W. Bush closed the Civil Rights Summit in Austin by focusing on how education and access to higher education can be the great equalizer for many people. Bush said he feared the soft bigotry of low expectations is returning

Bush detailed efforts by President Lyndon Baines Johnson that led to the signing of the Elementary and Second Education Act, which focused new funding on the lowest funding school district and creation of Head Start. Bush said despite those efforts, education in America is still not effectively equal.

Charles Bogel / U.S. National Archive

This week the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin is celebrating the Civil Rights Act of 1964. There will be discussions about the progress of civil rights issues through the course of the week and those discussions begin with gay rights.

From the original 1964 Civil Rights Act signing, President Lyndon Baines Johnson said:

“My fellow Americans, I’m about to sign into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964. I want to talk to you about what that law means to every American.” -- LBJ

Since he left office, former President George W. Bush has devoted part of his free time to painting – everything from his dog Barney to self-portraits. A year after a hacker revealed some of his works-in-progress, Bush had his first real art show Friday at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas.

The exhibit, titled "The Art of Leadership: A President's Personal Diplomacy," opens to the public Saturday. It features portraits of 24 world leaders, including Tony Blair, Vladimir Putin and the Dalai Lama.

Making a relatively rare appearance on national TV, former President George W. Bush told Tonight Show host Jay Leno on Tuesday's show that "I relied upon my faith, my family helped a lot and I had a good team around me" while in the White House.

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