Greg Abbott

Ryan E. Poppe

Gus Bard stares out of his kitchen window at the giant abandoned G.J. Sutton complex that stretches alongside his restaurant, Sweet Yams Organic on North Cherry Street.

“It should come down. If they are going to build something there it should be a space. They should stop building buildings that block the neighborhood from downtown,” Bard said.

 

The original white brick building with a gated entrance is just on the other side of the railroad tracks, across from the Alamodome and San Antonio’s downtown, on the city’s Eastside.

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For years the G.J. Sutton building has housed hundreds of state employees.   The 100-year old building is a massive complex that is one of the first structures to greet visitors entering San Antonio’s Eastside community.   In the last few years the building has fallen into disrepair and a colony of bats have moved in.

Planned Parenthood

The group is under fire for a hidden video conversation between Planned Parenthood’s national director of medical research Deborah Nucatula and two members of the antiabortion group Center for Medical Progress.  The abortion opponents were posing as representatives from a medical research company and secretly taped the meeting.

In the video Nucatula describes in graphic detail what she calls harvesting fetal organs and tissue samples for research:

Ryan E. Poppe

Abbott’s announcement came last night following talks he held with Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs at the Governor’s mansion in Austin.

Abbott said he and José Antonio Meade Kuribreña discussed enhancing trade and infrastructure needs between Texas and Mexico.

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A revitalization project for San Antonio’s Eastside community now bears the mark of Gov. Greg Abbott’s veto pen.  The Governor line-item vetoed a section of the state budget that would’ve rehabilitated and repurposed the city’s G.J. Sutton facility.

 

 

The 1912 building was once a featured structure of the City of San Antonio skyline.  But now city councilmember Allen Warrick says because of its dilapidated condition and lack of repairs the historic state building remains a shell of its former self.

 

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