Greg Abbott

Bob Daemmrich / The Texas Tribune

Legislation requiring the state’s public universities to allow handguns in dorms, classrooms and campus buildings is now one step away from becoming law. 

After final approval from the Texas House Sunday, Senate Bill 11 now heads to Gov. Greg Abbott, who has said he will sign the measure.

The state Senate approved the bill Saturday. 

It took about an hour Sunday for the chamber to pass the controversial measure — over the passionate pleas of several Democrats who rose to speak against it — on a 98-to-47 vote. 

Ryan E. Poppe

The State’s Office of Emergency Management has released its initial damage assessment related to severe weather and flooding rains.  For almost a month state officials have been looking at areas of the state that posed a potential risk, but were not able to predict where and when that might occur.

Courtesy: The Texas Department of Transportation / via Facebook

[Editor’s Note: Updated at 10:55 p.m. CDT, Monday]

A line of storms stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Lakes dumped record rainfall on parts of Texas, Oklahoma and other Plains and Midwest states over this long and disastrous Memorial Day weekend. Among the worst affected places were the small Texas community of Wimberley and nearby San Marcos in the Central Texas corridor between San Antonio and Austin. Many homes in those communities were damaged or destroyed. Twelve people are still unaccounted for. Here is a recap of the day’s events.

10:30 p.m. CDT

What a sheriff described as a “pretty destructive” tornado has destroyed four homes in Central Texas, killing a man. Milam County Judge Dave Barkemeyer said the storm hit a subdivision just outside of the city of Cameron, which is about 60 miles northeast of Austin. County Sheriff David Greene said the twister damaged 10 to 15 homes in all.

Barkemeyer said the man died when his mobile home was destroyed about 4 p.m. Monday. Four other people were injured. No identities have been released. That brings to four the number of people killed in Texas since Friday by the storms that damaged many parts of the state.

Ryan E. Poppe

AUSTIN — A newly struck budget deal is giving new Republican Gov. Greg Abbott the tax cuts he demanded but remains blemished by skepticism that Texas homeowners will notice any savings.

Ending weeks of discord between the House and Senate, the agreement late Thursday on a $3.8 billion package of new exemptions puts Abbott close to signing Texas’ biggest tax cuts in a decade and the bragging rights of finishing his first legislative session on time.

Republicans campaigned hard on tax cuts in 2014, and after the Legislature adjourns June 1, they can boast to voters back home they delivered. But even House Republicans have doubted their base will feel roughly $120 knocked off their property taxes, given fast-rising home appraisals in Texas, is enough.

Source: U.S. Geological Survey

In stark contrast to former Gov. Rick Perry, the current Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has told U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch that the state would comply with the Prison Rape Elimination Act.

In a letter to Lynch earlier this month, Abbott stated that Texas would “fully implement” the standards as much as possible. In the letter of May 15, Abbott wrote: “The State of Texas has taken significant steps to eliminate prison rape. I cannot yet certify that the State is in full compliance with Prison Rape Elimination Act (“PREA”) because our PREA audits are still ongoing. But every facility that has completed the PREA audit process has been certified as fully compliant. And I can assure you that we will fully implement DOJ’s PREA standards wherever feasible.”

The PREA requires segregating younger inmates from those who are over 18. Perry refused to comply, basically because 17-year-old criminal offenders in Texas are classified as adults. Federal law requires 17-year-olds to be housed separately from those 18 or older.