gun control

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

All week long we’ve been putting the 1966 UT Tower shooting into perspective, telling you how the gun culture has changed  in the last half century.

In Texas, there’s been a consistent loosening of regulations, especially for handguns, that began some 25 years ago. 

The trend seems to coincide with people feeling like they need to personally protect themselves.   It’s a feeling that runs through Texas history.

Guns are a major issue in the current political season. We’ve recently seen Democratic members of Congress stage a sit down strike on the floor of Congress and a Fillibuster by a Senate Democrat calling for votes on keeping guns from suspected terrorists on the no fly list.

“Making a Killing” is a documentary by Robert Greenwald takes a look at the untold stories of guns in America and the political power of the National Rifle Association.   

From Texas Standard:

Early in the morning on Sunday, June 12 a gunman killed 49 people and wounded 53 more at an Orlando gay nightclub. The lone shooter used a rifle similar to an AR-15 – a Sig Sauer MCX, which was originally designed for the U.S. Special Operations forces.

The tragic event sparked further outrage over the United States’ current gun control laws, which allow these types of guns to be purchased by the public.

 


Updated 2:30 a.m. ET Thursday:

Nearly 15 hours: The Associated Press reports that's how long Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy and his Democratic colleagues held the floor before yielding early Thursday, with a pledge that he would aggressively press for a legislative response to the Orlando, Fla., mass shooting. Murphy has been upset with congressional inaction on gun violence.

Original Post:

Senate Democrats say they are bringing Senate business to a halt in an effort to force some action on gun control.

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