gun control

UPDATE: Interim DA Named In Kaufman County

Apr 2, 2013

Update, Tuesday, 8:05 p.m.: Citing security concerns, a federal prosecutor in Houston has decided to remove himself from a large racketeering case involving the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas prison gang.

Wikipedia Commons

With the support of the Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, a state lawmaker has filed a bill that would block pending federal assault weapons ban from affecting Texas gun owners. 

Rep. Steve Toth, R-The Woodlands, said "The Texas Firearms Protection Act" draws a line in the sand when it comes to the ongoing debate in Washington over ban of assault-style weapons like the AR-15, the same type of weapon used in both the Newton, Conn. and Aurora, Colo. mass shootings.

Oleg Volt / Wikipedia Commons

Lawmakers heard testimony today on a series of bills that would allow college students and professors to carry guns on campus.  College students, professors, and trained professionals spoke to Members of the House Committee on Homeland Security and Public Safety. Some were in favor of the bill, and many felt threatened by the legislation.  University of North Texas Professor Dr. Tom Silveck said several incidents in his own classroom could have led to the next mass shooting if handguns were allowed in class.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Over 36 gun bills have been introduced so far this legislative session, ranging from lessening the time it takes to obtain a Concealed Handgun License, to bills like the one authored by Sen. Rodney Ellis, D-Houston that puts additional regulations on gun-owners and sellers.

"Currently Texas allows private weapon sales at gun-shows without background checks, so I filed a bill -- SB 1626 -- and it will require background checks for every gun sold in the state of Texas," Ellis said.

Texas lawmakers have rallied around the idea of making elementary schools safer. There have been calls to allow anyone with a concealed handgun license to bring guns onto public school campuses. Or for teachers to get concealed carry licenses.

The latest idea comes from a bill filed by State Representative Jason Villalba (R-Dallas). He wanted to know what schools and professional school security organizations wanted.