guns

More students walked out of their high schools on Wednesday, but this time they were walking out to support the right to bear arms.

"Stand for the Second" was organized by Will Riley, an 18-year-old high school senior from New Mexico. "It all starts [with] myself and a few of my friends in my living room, making calls," he told NPR.

The walkout comes on the heels of several larger, nationwide demonstrations that saw hundreds of thousands of students and other protesters call for gun control.

From Texas Standard.

Today, the majority of headlines about the National Rifle Association involve a bit of controversy – debates over gun laws inevitably following mass shootings, or boycotts by citizens or businesses not wanting to be affiliated with the gun rights group. But it hasn’t always been this way. At its founding, the NRA was focused on firearms skill and safety, not politics.

Churchill High School students walk out of class to call for tighter gun control laws April 20, 2018.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Hundreds of students at several different San Antonio schools called for an end to gun violence Friday by participating in walkouts and on-campus events.

For many who participated, ending gun violence means tightening gun control.

From Texas Standard.

Remington Arms – a gun company that has been in business for over 200 years – has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, and they’re not the only gun company that has seen shrinking profits lately. Sturm Ruger, as well as American Outdoors Brand, formerly known as Smith and Wesson, have been taking hits, too. Is Remington a victim of shifting public sentiment surrounding guns – or is something else going on?

3 Reasons Gun Companies Are Under Pressure

Mar 27, 2018

Remington Arms Co., an American gun company with roots stretching back over 200 years, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Saddled with almost $1 billion in debt and a victim of shifting market trends, Remington, like many other gun companies, faces a constant uphill battle wrought with political pressures and changing sentiments on gun ownership. Here are three reasons why gun companies are now struggling to find profits.

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