guns

Guns are a major issue in the current political season. We’ve recently seen Democratic members of Congress stage a sit down strike on the floor of Congress and a Fillibuster by a Senate Democrat calling for votes on keeping guns from suspected terrorists on the no fly list.

“Making a Killing” is a documentary by Robert Greenwald takes a look at the untold stories of guns in America and the political power of the National Rifle Association.   

From Texas Standard:

DallasBaton RougeNiceOrlando. It seems like we can’t go more than a few days without a violent event somewhere in the world. While it’s true these attacks are happening for very different and very complicated reasons – they keep happening. It’s almost hard to remember a time when they didn’t.

But when a shooter took aim at the University of Texas of Austin campus from the top of the UT tower on August 1, 1966,  no one had any reference point for such an attack. The Texas Standard spoke to people who were there that day as part of a documentary that will air Monday.

 


Flickr user David Trawin (trawin) / cc


Democrats took to the Senate floor Wednesday to demand votes on several stalled pieces of gun control legislation. Led by Chris Murphy of Connecticut, Senators spoke for 15 hours before getting a "commitment" from GOP leadership to schedule votes for their bills. The move comes days after a man claiming to be pledged to ISIS opened fire in an LGBT club in Orlando, killing scores of people. 

In addition to being the largest U.S. mass shooting in 100 years, it was the 133 mass shooting in the country. People are asking why nothing has been going in congress to address the issue. 

From Texas Standard:

The day after the biggest mass shooting in U.S. history, and the biggest terror attack in the U.S. since 9/11, President Obama addressed the nation.

Speaking to an issue he has addressed repeatedly during his two terms in the White House, President Obama struck, if not a note of resignation, something close to it.

The "powerful assault rifle" the president referred to is the AR-15, a long weapon with an instantly recognizable profile that belies its military origins – a model quite popular here in Texas. Its private ownership is protected by the Second Amendment, of which there are two dominant and dissonant visions.

 


Pages