Health Care

Sometimes I look at my husband and think, "I really don't remember what you just said." Is that because of his charming European accent, or because hey, we're married?

Don't leap to blame the accent, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis say. They are trying to figure out how the brain deals with foreign accents, hearing loss and other speed bumps on the road to understanding.

AUSTIN — The University of Texas says three students have tested positive for mumps, and officials are trying to notify classmates and guests at a fraternity party one of them attended last weekend.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says mumps rarely occurs across the country, after decades of vaccinations — but still shows up in a few hundred cases annually.

Mumps is caused by a virus. Symptoms include a few days of fever, headache, muscle aches, loss of appetite and swelling of salivary glands.

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FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Governors in Kansas and Texas say they will join Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s lawsuit against the Obama Administration, alleging that federal officials are coercing the state to expand Medicaid in order to get $1 billion in federal hospital funds.

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback said Monday he plans to file an amicus brief in a fight to protect states’ right to make their own decisions. Scott said Monday that he’d talked with Gov. Greg Abbott, who also pledged support.

Source: http://www.craneisd.com/

CRANE, Texas — An outbreak of chlamydia, a sexually transmitted disease, has been reported at a small West Texas high school.

KOSA-TV of Odessa and Midland reports the Crane Independent School District sent a letter last week to parents of Crane High School students informing them that 20 cases of chlamydia had been confirmed at the school. Crane High School has an enrollment of about 300 students.

State health officials had notified the district of a significant number of chlamydia cases reported in Crane County and adjacent Upton County. District officials plan meet with the school’s advisory committee of teachers, parents and school officials to discuss the situation Monday.

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OSCEOLA, Mo. — When 18-month-old Edith Gonzalez choked on a grape in August 2013, her parents rushed to Shelby Regional Medical Center in their hometown of Center, Texas, unaware that the hospital had closed several weeks earlier. Their daughter was dead by the time an ambulance had taken her to the next nearest hospital, more than 45 minutes later.

After 45 years of providing health care in rural western Missouri, the Sac-Osage Hospital is being sold piece by piece. Ceiling tiles are going for 25 cents, the room doors for an average of less than $4 each, the patient beds for $250 apiece. Soon, the remnants of the hospital that long symbolized the lifeblood of Osceola, population 923, will be torn to the ground.

Sac-Osage is one of a growing number of rural U.S. hospitals closing their doors, citing a complex combination of changing demographics, medical practices, management decisions and federal policies that have put more financial pressure on facilities that sometimes average only a few in-patients a day.

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