Health

As a society, we don't pay much attention to nutrition information when we eat out.

A U.S. Department of Agriculture report estimates just 8 percent of Americans use nutritional information when deciding what to order.

But that could change soon.

Crystal Chavez

The South Texas Blood & Tissue Center has a new device to make blood donations easier for young donors, and it looks like it's straight out of "Star Trek." The technology will be used during mobile blood drives at area high schools like Madison High in San Antonio where a recent drive was held.

Sarah Williams, a senior in ROTC at Madison, volunteered for it. Williams says she knows the importance of giving blood.

As schools cut down on physical education and recess, kids are spending more time than ever in a desk. And while nerdy second-graders like me didn't ever consider arguing for more gym, there's increasing evidence that being active helps not just children's waistlines but their brains.

"If you consider the anthropology of humankind, we were designed to move," Charles Hillman, a professor of kinesiology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign tells Shots.

Heart disease is the number one killer of people worldwide, so you'd think that we'd be up to speed on the risks. Evidently not, based on a poll of people in the United Kingdom.

Are you smarter than a Brit when it comes to risk factors? Take our quickie quiz and find out:

So are you smarter than a Brit? Here's how the 2,000 people polled by the British Heart Foundation fared:

  In the really old days, they were called pictographs; later they were called emoticons. Now, though, they’re called emojis, a new word originating in Japan for those smiley-face, thumbs-up and I-heart-you icons all over electronic devices. Emojis now include airplanes, jack-o-lanterns, kittens and just about every other animal – or fruit or facial expression – that one can imagine.

So why not use them in medicine?

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