HearSA

Perhaps you’ve heard about the human genome, the base structure of our DNA. And DNA is complicated, for sure. But did you know that the genes on our microbiome outnumber those in our genome by 100 to 1? Our microbiome is made up of the many microorganisms (bacteria, fungi) that reside on and within our body. And where the human genome is permanent, our microbiome is acquired at birth and changes along with our body throughout life.

April Chavez / TPR

Invasive Arundo cane, Zebra Mussels, and Hydrilla are among a host of aquatic plants and animals that are not native to Texas and compete with our native animals and plants for food and space. Because introduced species lack natural enemies in our waterways, they can multiply and spread at an alarming rate, interfering with boat traffic, affecting water quality and quantity, and causing a range of other problems. 

Paul Huchton Photography / http://paulhuchtonphotography.com

“God just gave us so much water. We can't make it, it's just there. But we’re making more people.” Such as it was plainly stated by Mike Bira at the latest Texas Water Symposium, held on February 23, 2017 on the campus of Texas State University in San Marcos. The panel discussion focused on watershed protection programs at a city and community level.

Think Science: Memory

Feb 17, 2017
Disney/Pixar

What happens to us when something… happens? How do humans make memories, and where do they go in our brains? Does the mind work like a filing cabinet, or is it more like your computer’s hard drive? And what happens to the brain when memory starts to fail? These are some of the questions we asked of two panelists at our lunchtime discussion, Think Science: Memory.

AgriLife Today http://bit.ly/1rFzmHP / cc

The legal challenges that come with private property rights and Texas’ growing need for water were the topic of the most recent Texas Water Symposium, held on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin.

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