high-speed rail

This story comes from Texas Standard.

Do anti high-speed rail efforts in the Texas legislature and in DC mean it’s an idea that’s going nowhere fast?

Aman Batheja is following the issue for the Texas Tribune.

On Who is Opposed to High-Speed Rail:

“The issue here is the rural communities between Dallas and Houston … The mayors of Dallas and Houston and a majority of the elected officials there strongly support the train project – they’re very strongly behind it. It’s the rural communities that are trying to figure out what’s in it for them.”

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

In the first segment:

Texas' constitutional ban on same-sex marriage is in the courtroom. Two same-sex couples have sued for the right to marry. One couple is from right here in San Antonio. Yesterday, the long-awaited suit heard arguments in a San Antonio federal district court.

The Texas Transportation Commission has given the green light to forming a high-speed rail commission to oversee a bullet train project between Fort Worth and Dallas. The Texas Department of Transportation agreed to take $15 million in federal funds in order to study the issue.

This week, commissioners set up a separate high-speed rail commission headed up by former transportation commissioner Bill Meadows.

There is serious talk about connecting San Antonio with a high-speed rail. But the bullet train isn’t heading to Austin or Houston, the drive is to connect San Antonio with Monterrey, Mexico.

On Thursday South Texas Congressman Henry Cuellar met with Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx along with state and Mexican officials to discuss the proposed rail system.

Cuellar said driving the 300 miles between the two cities now can take a full day because of busy border checkpoints, and the trip has its hazards. But the high-speed rail would change that.

Flickr user amanderson2

A Texas Department of Transportation study shows that portions of IH-35 in Bexar County rank 35th out of 100 roads in the state that are the most congested. A portion of IH-35 in Dallas ranks 9th most congested.

Combine that type of congestion with the number of people steadily moving to Texas, and a real transportation nightmare could be in store.