human trafficking

Photo courtesy of The Refuge Ranch.

This week on Fronteras:

  • Human trafficking is an international crime, but Texas authorities are learning to understand it as a local atrocity.
  • The fight to get Mexican-American studies in public schools (6:18).
  •  How a family divided by the U.S.-Mexico border struggles to keep a sense of normalcy in their lives (16:20)


From Texas Standard:

Warning: this story contains descriptions that are disturbing.

Authorities in Mexico this weekend arrested two people they say were involved in a human trafficking operation. They rescued 24 young women who are from Colombia and Venezuela. This incident underscores how most of us understand human trafficking – as an international crime. But authorities in Texas are deepening their understanding of human trafficking as a local crime.

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The discovery of a stifling tractor-trailer in San Antonio this weekend – packed with nearly 40 undocumented immigrants – is reverberating across the country. Ten people have died as a result of the possible human trafficking incident.

Since the case first came to light, some sources in the media have been using the terms 'human trafficking' and 'human smuggling' interchangeably. But they're two very different crimes.

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There are an estimated 313,000 victims of human trafficking in Texas, according to data released in December. Described as modern day slavery, human trafficking exploits children and adults by forcing them to engage in sex or labor.

From Texas Standard:

Activists gathered on the south steps of the Texas Capitol Wednesday morning to pressure lawmakers to keep fighting human trafficking during the 85th Legislative Session.

Advocates say there’s lots of work left to be done to curb trafficking. Now there are hard numbers to show by how much.

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