Hurricane Katrina

Long after the floodwaters recede and the debris is cleared, the mental health impacts of disasters like hurricanes can linger.

Psychologist Jean Rhodes of the University of Massachusetts-Boston has spent more than a decade studying what happens to people years after a natural disaster — in this case, Hurricane Katrina.

As Dr. Ruth Berggren digests the calamity affecting her new home state of Texas, she admits to some PTSD.

In 2005, she was an infectious-disease doctor at Charity Hospital in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina hit, and she became one of a small number of physicians left to care for 250 patients for six days, trapped by flooding and without running water or electricity.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In 2005, when the most destructive and costliest natural disaster in the history of the United States struck New Orleans, tens of thousands of people would wait out the rebuilding of their city in Houston. Now it's Houston's moment in history to recover from an epic inundation.

Lorrine Adamore is holed up in one of the three shelters the city of Dallas has set up for people fleeing Hurricane Harvey, now a tropical storm. It’s a familiar, and unsettling feeling. Twelve years ago she was rescued by boat when her New Orleans home was swamped by Hurricane Katrina and she relocated to Houston.

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