Immigration

To carry out his hard-line immigration policy, Donald Trump proposed hiring 5,000 additional Border Patrol agents and tripling the number of "deportation officers."

But that would continue an already decade-long expansion of the government agencies responsible for those tasks — even as the number of illegal border crossers has shrunk dramatically. That's not even to mention the billions of dollars it would cost to build a brick-and-mortar wall across the length of the entire U.S.-Mexico border.

Here are six things to consider:

Would a President Donald Trump attempt to forcefully remove an estimated 11 million people from the United States?

Three days after Trump's campaign first hinted it was reconsidering walking back from a core campaign promise, the answer still isn't clear.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

It was two summers ago that we saw the tremendous surge of unaccompanied minors and young mothers with children crossing the Rio Grande. They were fleeing out of control gang violence in Central America and surrendering to the first border agent they could find. The numbers of the children and women overwhelmed the immigration system.


Mayte Lara Ibarra and Larissa Martinez had just finished their senior year of high school when they each decided to go public with their immigration status. Both Texas students came to the U.S. illegally, and they didn't want to keep that fact a secret any longer.

Ibarra identified herself on Twitter as one of the 65,000 undocumented youth who graduate high school in the U.S. Martinez revealed her status in the commencement speech she delivered at graduation.

Their actions sparked support and pointed criticism. That was more than a month ago.

Jean Guerrero / KPBS Public Radio

Following are stories airing this week on Texas Public Radio's "Fronteras."

·         There’s a processing backlog at the southern California border where Haitian immigrants are overwhelming customs officials.

·         The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Texas abortion clinics but now they’re struggling to reopen.

·         Residents in New Mexico's South Valley live near polluting industries.  Now they’ve scored a victory in their quest for a place where kids can play.

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