Michael Vadon / Creative Commons

WASHINGTON — Worried about “Republican-on-Republican violence,” top party donors are taking action, with one firing off a letter calling for more civility and another seeking to block businessman Donald Trump from the debate stage altogether.

Foster Friess, a Wyoming-based investor and one of the party’s top 20 donors in the last presidential contest, issued a letter to 16 White House prospects and the Republican National Committee late last week calling for candidates to stay on the “civility reservation.”

“Our candidates will benefit if they all submit to Ronald Reagan’s 11th Commandment, ‘Thou shall not speak ill of a fellow Republican,’” Friess wrote in a letter sent to Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus. A copy was obtained by The Associated Press.

In the dispatch, Friess cites the backing of casino magnate Sheldon Adelson and Chicago Cubs co-owner Todd Ricketts. “Would you join the effort to inspire a more civil way of making their points?” Friess wrote. “If they drift off the ‘civility reservation,’ let’s all immediately communicate that to them.”

Flickr user Fibonacci Blue / cc

On Fronteras this week:

·        Same-sex marriage is the law of the land but in Texas some county officials are resisting

·        A civil rights expert and legal scholar says efforts to slow implementation of Supreme Court rulings is nothing new.  He puts the same-sex marriage ruling into historical context.

·        Congressional Democrats are raising questions about detention centers holding women and children.

·        Tijuana residents are asking the government to save an old river habitat threatened by development.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

SAN ANTONIO — About 250 immigrant children were given an adult dose of a hepatitis A vaccine at a Texas detention facility where they were being held with their mothers, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials.

The vaccines were administered this week, but none of the children has been hospitalized or had any adverse reactions, ICE officials said Saturday.

ICE spokesman Richard Rocha said health care professionals would monitor the children over the next five days for any potential side effects, though none are expected.

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

  This week on Fronteras:

--Texas is the number one U.S. destination for refugees.  The decision to leave home for the journey is a tough choice.

--In the wake of police confrontations, more Texas police departments are buying body cameras for their officers.  

--A Texas company is a go-to source in the growing market for police body cameras.

--Mexicans who have been departed say it’s hard to earn the parole they need to fight their cases in the United States.

--Women make up only 25 percent of workers in the male dominated oil business.