The White House

HOUSTON — The U.S. government says it “erroneously” awarded three-year work permits to 2,000 people under President Barack Obama's executive immigration action after a judge had put the plan on hold.

The revelation is the second time the federal government has had to clarify whether part of the immigration plan had been implemented after a court order that put it on hold.

In a court document filed Thursday, the Justice Department said that U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services discovered that about 2,000 individuals had been mistakenly sent three-year work authorizations after U.S. District Judge Andrew Hanen in Brownsville, Texas, issued a preliminary injunction on Feb. 16 that temporarily blocked the immigration action.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

SAN ANTONIO — A federal judge has denied a temporary restraining order sought by three immigrant mothers who alleged retaliation against them for participation in a hunger strike at a South Texas detention center.

The three women, who are from Latin America and seeking asylum, sought the restraining order as part of a of a class-action complaint against U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials and the private operator of the Karnes City Residential Center.

During a Thursday hearing, the women testified they were held in isolation in the center clinic.

Joy Diaz / KUT Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:

--A half-million people on the Texas-Mexico border live in colonias which often lack running water, electricity and basic services.  The Obama Administration wants border states to spend more money to improve life in these communities.

--The Cardinal considered to be Pope Francis’ most reliable advisor blames Mexican drugs lords for the surge of Central American children crossing the border into the United States.

--Attorneys get courtroom training on how to win asylum for detained immigrant mothers and children.

Gage Skidmore / CC

HOUSTON — Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush declared Wednesday that 11 million immigrants in the country illegally should have an opportunity to stay, wading yet again into his party’s contentious immigrant debate.

In tone and substance, Bush stands out among the many Republicans lining up for the GOP’s next presidential primary, where conservatives who oppose an immigration overhaul often hold outsized influence. As he moves toward a presidential campaign, the brother and son of former presidents has not backed away from his defense of immigrants in the country illegally and a policy that would allow them to attain legal status under certain conditions.

“We’re a nation of immigrants,” Bush said at the National Christian Hispanic Leadership Conference that brought several hundred Hispanic evangelical leaders to Houston this week. “This is not the time to abandon something that makes us special and unique.”

As NPR and other news outlets report about the hundreds of people killed this month when the ship they were on went down off the Libyan coast, the stories are referring to those who died as "migrants."