Internet

Updated at 5:17 p.m. ET

It's 1995, and Chris Cox is on a plane reading a newspaper. One article about a recent court decision catches his eye. This moment, in a way, ends up changing his life — and, to this day, it continues to change ours.

The case that caught the congressman's attention involved some posts on a bulletin board — the early-Internet precursor to today's social media. The ruling led to a new law, co-authored by Cox and often called simply "Section 230."

Eddie Torres

This week on Fronteras:

  • Black women are dying either before or after childbirth in higher numbers than the rest of the Texas population.
  • The small South Texas city of Pharr is connecting homes with free broadband internet in an effort to close the digital divide (8:33).
  • Local composer Federico Chavez-Blanco has been commissioned to write music for San Antonio’s Tricentennial celebration (14:15).


Look up from this screen right now. Take a look around. On a bus. In a cafe. Even at a stoplight. Chances are, most of the other people in your line of sight are staring at their phones or other devices. And if they don't happen to have one out, it is certainly tucked away in a pocket or bag.

But are we truly addicted to technology? And what about our kids? It's a scary question, and a big one for scientists right now. Still, while the debate rages on, some doctors and technologists are focusing on solutions.

From Texas Standard.

The FCC is expected to vote this week on whether to repeal Obama-era rules that made net neutrality the law of the land.

Put simply, net neutrality means that internet service providers like Verizon or AT&T, can’t prioritize one kind of content over others. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who is championing the repeal, says regulating the internet in this way stifles innovation. In fact, if the rollback is approved, the FCC would have very little to say about what happens on the Internet. That has sparked protests in Houston and Dallas, and though they haven’t exactly brought traffic to a standstill, the potential  rollback because of what it could mean to users of the Internet, as well as those who build their businesses there.

Pixabay http://bit.ly/2qrv6CY

One in four San Antonio households do not have access to the internet.

Low-income and rural communities are more prone to suffer from the "digital divide" — a disparity in access to technology and the internet — which exacerbates economic, social and political imbalances.

Pages