IRS

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WASHINGTON — Promising to abolish the Internal Revenue Service is a good talking point for political candidates who are looking to fire up the Republicans’ most conservative voters. It’s also unlikely to ever happen, no matter how easy folks such as Sen. Ted Cruz like to make it sound.

The Texas Republican is pledging to scrap the tax-collecting agency as he runs for the GOP presidential nomination in 2016. He joins potential contenders and the Republican National Committee itself in the decidedly longshot push to dismantle the unquestionably unpopular IRS. “Imagine abolishing the IRS,” Cruz told college students during his campaign launch Monday. Compared with America’s history of fighting communism, wars and economic calamities, he said, “abolishing the IRS ain’t all that tough.”

Actually, it could be pretty difficult.

The IRS collects more than $2.4 trillion every year — money that picks up the tab for the military, Social Security, Medicare, all those projects that lawmakers love to bring home to constituents and so much more.

Brendan Hoffman http://bit.ly/1vp5Q14 / CC

Reporting by the Center for Public Integrity has shown that despite spending hundreds of millions of dollars on elections, nonprofits--many considered "social welfare" groups--are regularly getting away with breaking election law and aren't being audited or investigated by the Internal Revenue Service.

Since the Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission decision in 2010, a deluge of campaign spending has been poured in by dark money groups. 

The Norman Rockwell Family Agency

In the first segment:

In the Cleveland office of the Internal Revenue Service, a technique to flag certain 501(c)4 applications for tax exempt status has turned into a national scandal, with conservative groups crying foul. The San Antonio Tea Party has joined a class action lawsuit against the IRS and persons within it.