Japan

The Secret History Of Black Baseball Players In Japan

Jul 14, 2015

In the fall of 1936, a 24-year-old black baseball player from rural Louisiana stepped off a boat in Tokyo. His name was James Bonner. An ace pitcher with a vicious submarine pitch, Bonner, according to Japanese newspapers breathlessly heralding his arrival, once threw 22 strikeouts in a single game back in the States.

Carl Myers / University of the Incarnate Word

Japan holds a close relationship with the Lone Star State; it's the fourth largest importer of goods from Texas. On Friday, June 19, a high-level Japanese delegation presented a panel discussion on Japan's challenges and opportunities in the twenty-first century. Led by former Ambassador Yasuo Saito, the delegates are part of the "Walk in U.S., Talk on Japan" initiative, organized by the Office of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in order to foster exchange and cultural understanding. 

In the U.S., Tea Party politics refers to a certain strain of Republican conservatism. But in Japan, tea politics are of an altogether different sort: The ritual drinking of this ancient beverage — often thought of as the epitome of Japanese restraint and formality — has long been entwined with issues of power and national identity.

The latest robot sensation in Japan is so lifelike that when she was on the floor of a Tokyo department store recently, she was confused for a human being. The new humanoid's name is Aiko Chihira, and she was working in customer service, clad in a traditional silk kimono.

Japan's population fell by a record 268,000 people last year, new data show, with preliminary figures showing just more than 1 million births in 2014.

The figures released by the country's health ministry showed that the estimated number of people who died in 2014 was 1,269,000, about 1,000 above the previous year. The number of births was 1,001,000, down about 29,000 from 2013. The total population declined by a record 268,000.

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