Jeb Bush

After nearly a week of confusion over his position on Iraq, the Middle East and the role of his brother as an adviser, Jeb Bush fully walked back his position that he would have gone to war in Iraq even knowing what we know now.

"So here's the deal," Bush told an audience in Arizona. "If we're all supposed to answer hypothetical questions, knowing what we know now, I would not have engaged. I would not have gone into Iraq. That's not to say that the world is safer because Saddam Hussein is gone. It is significantly safer."

Immigration: Where Do The Presidential Hopefuls Stand?

May 7, 2015
ACLU of Texas

WASHINGTON — Immigration, a prominent issue as the presidential campaign begins in earnest, is a complicated, emotional and broad subject. But for political purposes there’s a very real question to be answered: What to do about the estimated 11 million people in the country illegally.

President Barack Obama says his executive actions blocking the deportation of millions living illegally in the U.S. go as far as the law allows. But Hillary Rodham Clinton says that if she becomes president, she would go even further.

Gage Skidmore / CC

HOUSTON — Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush declared Wednesday that 11 million immigrants in the country illegally should have an opportunity to stay, wading yet again into his party’s contentious immigrant debate.

In tone and substance, Bush stands out among the many Republicans lining up for the GOP’s next presidential primary, where conservatives who oppose an immigration overhaul often hold outsized influence. As he moves toward a presidential campaign, the brother and son of former presidents has not backed away from his defense of immigrants in the country illegally and a policy that would allow them to attain legal status under certain conditions.

“We’re a nation of immigrants,” Bush said at the National Christian Hispanic Leadership Conference that brought several hundred Hispanic evangelical leaders to Houston this week. “This is not the time to abandon something that makes us special and unique.”

Marco Rubio, the charismatic, Hispanic, young (and even younger-looking) freshman senator from Florida is launching his campaign for the White House Monday in Miami.

Rubio, 43, will be entering a growing field of candidates. Right now, he's considered a second-tier candidate, polling behind Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, the man Rubio has called a mentor.

That could change once he gets in. Rubio's advisers believe he has a path to the nomination, with assets few other candidates can match.

Cooper Neill / Texas Tribune

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The parade of potential Republican presidential candidates speaking at the National Rifle Association’s annual convention isn’t one to make waves with the powerful gun-rights group. The contenders are sitting pretty in NRA ratings of their positions on gun issues, with scores ranging from A to A-minus.

The speakers get 10 minutes each on Friday to preach to the choir on their pro-gun bona fides. “This is the ultimate choir,” said Chip Saltsman, who ran the 2008 presidential campaign of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, among the speakers at the event. “Any time you get 70,000 pro-Second Amendment people in one place, it’s a good opportunity for anybody running on the Republican side.”

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