Johann Sebastian Bach

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DANIEL ZWERDLING, HOST:

Full House Productions

The performance seasons for many regional arts organizations are rapidly winding down.  We're told the story of one out of Kerrville by Symphony of the Hills' Gene Dowdy.

“Symphony of the Hills is going to close our season with a concert called 'Bach and his disciples.' It’s a concert dedicated to the great Johann Sebastian Bach, the great German composer of the Baroque period, and just the influence he’s had through the hundreds of years since his life.”

Liz Garza Williams

The San Antonio Symphony is taking music to one of the city’s most intimate places to view music being made.  Akiko Fujimoto is the Associate Conductor.

“We have the second Baroque concert of the season. We are performing the Brandenburg Concertos by Bach. Out of the six concertos we are performing numbers one, three and five. The odd-numbered ones.”

They’re performing the odd-numbered ones in a not-so-odd venue.

Almost any pianist, from a budding beginner to a pro like Simone Dinnerstein, will tell you that one of the basic techniques of keyboard playing is also the toughest to master: making your hands to do separate things simultaneously.

On a plaza outside a hotel in Culver City, Calif., four people are stalking each other with PlayStation Move controllers. The devices look a bit like microphones, with glowing orbs on top lit up in pink, yellow and blue.

Video game designer Douglas Wilson is holding a portable speaker, blasting Johann Sebastian Bach's Brandenburg Concertos.

From afar, this looks like some sort of public performance art. But it is actually a high-tech combination of tag and musical chairs, called Johann Sebastian Joust.

Pages