Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland

Jonathan Ryan / RAICES

As the number of unaccompanied minors crossing the border into Texas continues to increase, local agencies have been stepping in to help with the care for the children.

A legal immigration assistance center has re-focused its mission to help during the crisis, and has begun serving children at Lackland and across South Texas. 

Tom Michael / KRTS

Fronteras: If you're questioned by law enforcement at a traffic stop, what are you required to answer? As demographics change across the nation and in Texas, there’s growing concern about Alzheimer’s disease among Mexican-Americans—a population that continues to age. More minors from south of the border are making the dangerous journey to the U.S. illegally and alone. We visit Joint Base San Antonio Lackland where many of those minors are being housed.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  On Thursday the military oversaw a media tour of the Air Force barracks at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, where 1,200 immigrant children who came to the U.S. without adults are being temporarily sheltered in San Antonio.

Situated in the midst of dozens of identical military barracks where young men and women go through Air Force basic training, one building is now filled with children.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. The number of children crossing the U.S. border on their own is soaring. Just since October, the U.S. found some 80,000 unaccompanied minors crossing over from Mexico. Those are just the kids who were caught.

Jason Minto / U.S. Air Force

Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland is trading out some of its C5-series cargo planes as part of the military downsizing occurring around the globe.

When the force restructure cutbacks were announced in 2012, the 433rd Airlift Wing learned its C-5A aircraft would be part of that reorganization.

"We're getting the C-5M models," said Public Affairs Officer Maj. Timothy Wade. He said San Antonio’s 433rd is trading out its big cargo jets in exchange for a smaller fleet of newer models.

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