KPAC

KPAC Celebrates 35 Years

Nov 3, 2017

On November 7, 1982, classical station KPAC began broadcasting at 90.9 FM. The first piece played on the air was Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Brandenburg Concerto No. 3.” Later in the 1980s, the merger of the Classical Broadcasting Society and San Antonio Community Radio led to KSTX 89.1 FM, and the creation of Texas Public Radio. Five more stations followed, bringing NPR programming and music to listeners all over central Texas. Today, more than 80,000 people tune in to KPAC 88.3 each week to enjoy the greatest music of all time.

Greg Gorman / Los Angeles Grand Opera

UPDATE (10/16/17): Placido Domingo's concert at the Alamodome has been postponed until further notice. The promoters and venue are working on an alternate date for his appearance in San Antonio.  

Gift of Robert L. B. Tobin / McNay Art Museum

KPAC's "The Art of American Popular Song" approaches the end of the line (for the series, not popular song!) with this celebration of great craftsmen. Vernon Duke, Arthur Schwartz, Harry Warren, Kay Swift, Hoagy Carmichael, Vincent Youmans, and Kurt Weill are featured alongside Hugh Martin, who at the time of the original production was the only of the songwriting legends of the first half of the twentieth century still alive.

Sam Arlen

The KPAC series of more than a decade ago, "The Art of American Popular Song," followed a blueprint laid out by the composer and writer Alec Wilder.

Biography.com

Unlike Jerome Kern and Harold Arlen, who wrote their songs with numerous collaborative lyricists, and not at all like Irving Berlin and Cole Porter, who preferred doing it all themselves, writing both the music and the words, Richard Rodgers was most comfortable, and most successful, when in partnership with another. Over the course of his long and storied career in musical theater and beyond, Rodgers enjoyed two important partnerships.

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