Latino vote

A conservative Latino group is voicing its frustration with Republican immigration rhetoric on the campaign trail.

In a letter obtained by NPR, the Libre Initiative, which is funded by the Koch brothers, made a clear, bold statement aimed at fellow conservatives. It criticized what it sees as policies that "are not in line with our principles and are not in the best interest of the country." (The full letter is at the bottom of the post.)

After World War II, Mexican American veterans returned home to lead the struggle for civil rights.

Many of their stories have been recorded by the Voces Oral History Project founded and directed by Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez at the University of Texas at Austin School of Journalism.

In her new book “Texas Mexican Americans and Post War Civil Rights Rivas Rodriguez tells the stories of three lesser known battles in Mexican American civil rights in Texas.

My parents are Cuban and Panamanian. I grew up in Miami. I travel broadly in Latin America but reside in Brazil, which speaks Portuguese, not Spanish.

So what am I?

This may seem an irrelevant question to many, but as the American presidential season kicks into high gear there's been a lot of confusion about how to refer to people alternately called Hispanics or Latinos.

Immigration has taken over the 2016 Republican presidential race. See, for instance, Donald Trump's position paper that included a call to deport those in the country illegally and to challenge the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution — the one that says anyone born in the United States is an American citizen.

A new poll from the Spanish-language broadcaster Univision has some bad news for Republicans. Democrats once again hold a big lead among Latino voters going into the next presidential campaign.

But there are a few bright spots for Republicans. Former Florida governor Jeb Bush has made big strides in closing the gap in a hypothetical matchup against Hillary Clinton, and both Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio have Latino parents.

Pages