Latino vote

A big deal has been made about the Republican Party's so-called Hispanic problem during recent U.S. election cycles. But there's another group — largely white and male — that has also struggled to increase the number of Latinos in its ranks: America's religiously unaffiliated. Until recently, that is.

Wendy Davis campaign

This week Democratic and Republican candidates for governor Wendy Davis and Greg Abbott both  launched separate online efforts to reach Latino voters.

Abbott’s online campaign ad details how multiculturalism works for a modern-day Texas. The ad features Abbott’s mixed-race family.

“You look at my family, you see a family that is so typical of families across the State of Texas. We’re both Anglo and Hispanic, as well as Irish. We’re Catholic, we’re Protestant but we’re all one family.  The idea is that multiculturalism works in the State of Texas.”

State Rep. Jason Villalba, R-Dallas, stopped through San Antonio on a statewide speaking tour, hoping to make an impact with Latino voters that will help keep Republicans in the majority.

Villalba's message is that the Republican party faces a major challenge with its outreach and engagement of Latino voters.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott easily cruised to a primary victory Tuesday night, claiming over 91 percent of the votes cast, and is now looking forward to the general election in November.

Former Texas Secretary of State Hope Andrade said it’s no accident that Abbott picked San Antonio to hold his primary victory celebration. She said it’s a city that’s close to his heart and it’s also key to helping the Texas Republican Party win a greater share of the Hispanic vote.

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

The last presidential election showed the kind of clout that Latino voters have. With President Barack Obama gaining a  of the demographic the question has been: What will the GOP do to gain traction with Latinos?

Has the Democratic party just done a better job of welcoming Latinos?

Texas has a better record for the Grand Old Party with several Latino legislators in Austin and a comfortable 38 percent of the Latino vote going to Gov. Rick Perry in 2010, but also has an extremely low turnout of Latino voters.