Leonard Bernstein

Paul de Hauck / The Leonard Bernstein Office, Inc.

I still remember the day Leonard Bernstein died, just as I remember the feeling of loss the day Miles Davis passed, or the Sunday morning in Mexico City when I heard the news that Herbert von Karajan had died. These musicians were important, not just to me, but to the world, and it's why so many still preface their remarks about Bernstein with: “I can't believe it's been this long.” As I write this, it has been almost a quarter century.

Janet Rogers

It’s a good time to be an opera fan in San Antonio. In addition to the newly-formed Opera San Antonio, Opera Piccola, led by longtime singer and impresario Mark Richter, opens their third season this weekend at the historic Empire Theatre. On the bill are two one-act operas that capture America in the 1950s.

Leonard Bernstein's Letters

Nov 28, 2013

Leonard Bernstein is widely considered one of the great American composers and conductors. He was the longtime music director of the New York Philharmonic, and he composed the music for “West Side Story” and other musicals, in addition to serious works of contemporary American classical music.

Leonard Bernstein was a singular American genius. One of the great orchestra conductors of the 20th Century, he was also a composer of hit musicals like West Side Story, as well as symphonies and ballets. He was a teacher and television personality — his Young People's Concerts introduced generations of children to classical music.

Al Ravenna / Wikimedia Commons

Leonard Bernstein wrote only one original film score in his career, for Elia Kazan’s classic film, “On the Waterfront,” starring Marlon Brando as Terry Malloy, a troubled longshoreman and one-time contender who’s gotten mixed up with the wrong crowd. Like Brando’s character, Bernstein’s score is a mixture of tenderness, violence, and nobility.