LGBTQ

Gay and lesbian activists gather at the White House on Thursday for a celebration marking LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) Pride Month. It's become an annual event, tied to the monthlong commemoration of the Stonewall riots, which helped launch the modern gay liberation movement.

President Obama's years in office have seen a flowering of gay and lesbian rights, culminating a year ago when the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states.

Defense Secretary Ash Carter this week wrote a letter affirming the Dept artment of Defense support of the LGBT community. 

This is Pride Month, and Carter wrote that as the gay community gathers with its family, friends and allies, the DOD recognizes the service by brave LGBT soldiers, sailors, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and Marines who have fought for their country.

Ryan Poppe

Parents of transgender children argue they are being left out of the conversation when it comes to the state’s fight against public school district changes in bathroom ordinances.   A Tuesday rally followed a request for Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s legal opinion on whether these school districts are violating state law.

The Obama administration is taking steps to name the first national monument dedicated to the struggle for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights.

A likely location is in New York City, where the Stonewall riots sparked the modern gay-rights movement almost a half-century ago.

"It sounded like screaming and real cries of agony and desperation finally being released," recalls Martin Boyce, 68, who participated in the riots in the early hours of June 28, 1969.

From Texas Standard:

Friday morning the Obama administration issued a directive – what some on the right see as a decree – telling every public school district in the country to allow transgender students to use bathrooms that match their gender identity. If schools refuse to allow this, they could be in violation of the Civil Rights act of 1964.

The notice comes in the middle of a heated national debate over bathroom laws in public spaces, but it has no official force of law behind it. It amounts to what the New York Times calls an “implicit threat.”

Attached to the letter that went out to schools across the U.S., was a 25-page booklet of what are called emerging practices, or tips on how to comply.


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