LGBTQ

Republican Party of Texas

Two Republican groups that support equal rights for the LGBT community are rallying support to have the Republican Party of Texas change its official platform on same-sex marriage and other LGBT issues.

This week the Log Cabin Republicans of Texas and the Metroplex Republicans were denied permission to have a booth at the Texas GOP convention in Fort Worth. The two group's stance on LGBT issues put them in contrast to the official Texas GOP 2012 platform:

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

AT&T company leaders are dismissing sexual harassment allegations made by a contracted employee late last year against two of its workers.

The complaint is the city's first since council members passed the controversial non-discrimination ordinance revision.

Last September, as city council debated the revised non-discrimination ordinance to add sexual orientation and gender identity to the list of protected groups in San Antonio, a case hinging on gender identity harassment was brewing.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

Eight months have passed since San Antonio city leaders approved a revision to the city's non-discrimination ordinance. The update included the addition of gender identity, sexual orientation and veteran status to the list of protected classes in the city.

But nearly a year later, residents still have no clear way of filing a complaint.

According to Deputy City Attorney Veronica Zertuche, currently there is no single place where people can go to make their complaint.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

Block walking is an effective way to reach voters, according to Corey Clark. He's the 26-year-old small business owner who is running for San Antonio City Council District 9 in the May 10 joint, special and bond election.

"Morning, y'all," he said to residents off Bitters Tuesday. "I'm running for city office right now, District 9 city councilman."

A same-sex couple married in Washington, D.C., and wanting a divorce in Texas was told by a state district judge that Texas’ view on same-sex marriages, which includes divorce, is unconstitutional.

Allison Lesh and Kristi Lesh were married in Washington, D.C., in 2010 and then moved to Texas. Soon after, Kristi was artificially inseminated and became pregnant and a year later the couple split up and a custody battle ensued.

Allison, who was not the biological mother, was prevented from any type of visitation because of Texas laws banning same-sex marriage.  

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