literature

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Luis Alberto Urrea was born in Tijuana, Mexico, to a Mexican father and an American mother. The acclaimed author is best known for his novels about the U.S.-Mexico border, including "The Devil's Highway."

On this episode of "Texas Matters," contributor Yvette Benavides talks to Urrea about his latest work, "The House of Broken Angels," which is based on real-life events.


Josue Vazquez

An international evening of dance, music and literature is planned for Wednesday night. Sponsored by Alianza Latinoamericana, the evening starts off with dance--specifically, the Tango. Don't know how to Tango? Josue Vazquez says not a problem.

"We will have a tango lesson--Argentine Tango lesson. My friend Manuel Lobo will be teaching the lesson. We have a large selection of tangos. It will be basic tango for people who never done it. If somebody is there has done it before, we can accommodate them, too."

Hotel Emma

It's a series of gatherings for those who treasure the spoken and written word.  Sherry Kafka Wagner created the gatherings, and they grew out of her love for literature. Because of that, she spent a lifetime buying and reading books. Recently, she gave them all away. 


Texas is known for its writers of almost every genre – but maybe not so much for its writers of horror. And that could be seen as an oversight. The Texas talent pool has it’s dark side. And there is so much about the lone star state that is lurking in the shadows – and haunting the recesses of our minds.

The current leading Texas horror writers are collected in a new anthology called “Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers.”

Austin-based author, Elizabeth Harris, brings us the story of a woman who is the victim of a violent act.  In Mayhem: The Three Lives of a Woman, protagonist, Evelyn Kunkel Gant does indeed live three lives. She is daughter, wife, and then, as a victim of sexual assault, a pariah—one who never receives any kind of compassion or vindication—except through the telling of her story.  Elizabeth Harris takes us to the rural Texas of the 1930s—a place immersed in gender and social expectations that bring no sympathy to Evelyn.