local music

Dana Clark and Narjis Pierre

In countries around the world, refugees are trying to find their paths out of war zones. Here in San Antonio an organization quietly goes about the business of acclimating refugees to life in the U.S and they're using music to help.

Lennon Maldonado / TPR

Elizabeth Cave is sure of herself, even if she isn’t sure where her music fits in. “People tell me ‘you should try to play clubs, you should go to these open mic nights,’ but I don’t necessarily know if that’s where this music is meant to be [heard],” says Cave.

As Cave explains, her songs, which often address themes of social justice, come from deeply Christian roots.

Brandon Watts / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wattsbw2004/6819759428

The St. Mary's strip lost most of its traffic after the construction of Highway 281 north, but the late 1980s and early '90s marked the resurgence of the strip as a bar scene so prolific an estimated 15,000 turned out for an MTV promoted street party.

Call it San Antonio's West Side Sound, Chicano Soul, West Side Soul, doo-wop with horns, whatever you call it, San Antonio was the site of a musical mash up, a cultural clash and sound synthesis that is resonating decades after its 60s and mid-70s creation. 

Bands like "Sonny Ace & The Twisters," "Rudy Tee & The Reno Bops," "Little Henry & and The Laveers," are just a few of the bands that made up a very popular but highly localized scene. Jason Longoria, owner of El Westside Sound System says the music is still with us.

Doo-wop harmonies, lovelorn lyrics and soulful horns came together to form a fresh sound in the early ‘60s to mid ‘70s on San Antonio’s west side. Described by Fresh Air as being “among the least-known music scenes ever to thrive in America,” the sound was truly multiracial and multicultural.

Pages