local music

Brandon Watts / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wattsbw2004/6819759428 / cc

The St. Mary's strip lost most of its traffic after the construction of Highway 281 north, but the late 1980s and early '90s marked the resurgence of the strip as a bar scene so prolific an estimated 15,000 turned out for an MTV promoted street party.

Call it San Antonio's West Side Sound, Chicano Soul, West Side Soul, doo-wop with horns, whatever you call it, San Antonio was the site of a musical mash up, a cultural clash and sound synthesis that is resonating decades after its 60s and mid-70s creation. 

Bands like "Sonny Ace & The Twisters," "Rudy Tee & The Reno Bops," "Little Henry & and The Laveers," are just a few of the bands that made up a very popular but highly localized scene. Jason Longoria, owner of El Westside Sound System says the music is still with us.

Doo-wop harmonies, lovelorn lyrics and soulful horns came together to form a fresh sound in the early ‘60s to mid ‘70s on San Antonio’s west side. Described by Fresh Air as being “among the least-known music scenes ever to thrive in America,” the sound was truly multiracial and multicultural.

From Texas Standard:

Music is undergoing a transformation – chances are you've not only heard of Spotify and Pandora, you're a subscriber too. The vinyl of old is long gone.

At clubs and bars, the DJs – most of them are men – typically work fake turntables controlling mp3 files. That's just the way its done today.

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