Lyndon Baines Johnson

Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas
3:28 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

LBJ Carried Poor Texas Town With Him In Civil Rights Fight

Long before he was president, Lyndon Johnson taught in Cotulla, Texas. He is pictured here with students in 1928.
Courtesy of LBJ Library

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:34 am

Today Cotulla, Texas, is reaping the benefits of an oil and natural gas boom in the Eagle Ford Shale. But in 1928, the South Texas town was incredibly poor — and that's how Lyndon Johnson saw it when he had his first job there at age 20.

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Civil Rights Act
11:25 am
Fri April 11, 2014

President Obama Honors The Memory Of LBJ And Signing Of Civil Rights Act

President Barack Obama speaks in Austin at the LBJ Presidential Library.
White House Press Office

Speaking to select crowd at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library in Austin on Thursday, President Barack Obama honored the life of the former president and detailed the progressive effects of Johnson’s signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Obama told the crowd the change sparked by Johnson has been progressively powerful at changing how the world identified and enforced civil rights.

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It's All Politics
5:31 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Luci Baines Johnson: Vietnam War 'Lanced' LBJ's Gut Every Night

Luci Baines Johnson greets residents as she accompanies her mother, Lady Bird Johnson, to Savannah, Ga., on Oct. 8, 1964.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 10:27 am

The 50th anniversary of President Johnson's signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act is being celebrated this week at the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

NPR's Don Gonyea spoke Wednesday to Luci Baines Johnson, the 66-year-old younger daughter of the 36th president, about some of the human dimensions of the presidency.

Here are some highlights from their discussion:

On the toll the presidency took on her father

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Code Switch
2:05 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Step Behind Closed Doors And Into The LBJ Library's Time Machine

LBJ meets with Solicitor General Thurgood Marshall just before announcing his nomination to the Supreme Court.
Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 5:04 pm

This week, the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library and Museum in Austin, Texas, is holding a major conference on civil rights. It's a big deal. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Johnson's signing of the Civil Rights Act. The legacy of the landmark legislation is as significant and complicated as that of the late president himself, who cajoled, cornered and courted lawmakers to approve the bill.

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Civil Rights
3:31 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Celebrating 50 Years Of Progress, Civil Rights Summit Begins In Austin

LBJ Presidential Library
Charles Bogel U.S. National Archive

This week the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin is celebrating the Civil Rights Act of 1964. There will be discussions about the progress of civil rights issues through the course of the week and those discussions begin with gay rights.

From the original 1964 Civil Rights Act signing, President Lyndon Baines Johnson said:

“My fellow Americans, I’m about to sign into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964. I want to talk to you about what that law means to every American.” -- LBJ

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The Source - April 7, 2014
2:11 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Source: Civil Rights Act 50 Years Old

President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964 on July 2, 1964
LBJ Presidential Library public domain

  The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was signed into law July 2, 1964. It was the result of a hundred years of discrimination, hundreds of sit-ins and non-violent protests, and a political battle as large as the shift in history the act would prove to have. 

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Arts & Culture
9:03 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Play Illuminates Tumultuous Year In LBJ's Life

At left, Bryan Cranston is pictured as Lyndon Johnson in "All the Way." At right is Lyndon Johnson. (Evgenia Eliseeva/American Repertory Theater)

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 3:18 pm

The new play “All The Way” is now in previews on Broadway. Written by Robert Shenken and commissioned by the Oregon Shakespeare festival, it tells the story of a year in the life of President Lyndon B. Johnson, who is played by former “Breaking Bad” star Bryan Cranston.

Beginning in November 1963, when Johnson took office after President Kennedy was assassinated, “All the Way” focuses on Johnson’s push to pass Kennedy’s civil rights legislation and get reelected at the same time.

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Interviews
1:59 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

In 'Passage,' Caro Mines LBJ's Changing Political Roles

Vice President Spiro Agnew (right) and former President Lyndon Johnson view the liftoff of Apollo 11 from the stands at the Kennedy Space Center on July 16, 1969.
NASA Getty Images

This interview was originally broadcast on May 13, 2013.

For the past 37 years, Robert Caro has devoted his life to writing the definitive biography of Lyndon Johnson. So far, The Years of Lyndon Johnson has four acclaimed volumes and has shown readers just how complex the 36th president was, as both a politician and a man.

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Code Switch
9:26 am
Sat January 18, 2014

When King And Johnson Joined Forces To Fight The War On Poverty

Martin Luther King, Jr. (center), with Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, and Whitney Young, met with President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Oval Office on Jan. 18, 1964.
Lyndon B. Johnson Library

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 8:05 am

When President Lyndon B. Johnson met at the White House with the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. on Jan. 18, 1964, the two men were near the peak of their powers and the country was in a maelstrom.

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The Source - January 8, 2014
10:53 am
Thu January 9, 2014

The Source: The War On Poverty 50 Years Later

War on Poverty Tour: President Lyndon B. Johnson shakes the hand of one of the residents of Appalachia as Agent Rufus Youngblood (far left) looks on
LBJ Library photo by Cecil Stoughton

Fifty years ago last night, President Lyndon Baines Johnson called on lawmakers to help him wage a war on poverty. Few would argue that poverty is still a large issue today, but the effectiveness of the programs launched -- programs like Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, Job Corps, etc. -- are widely debated depending on what party you identify with.

Today we talk about the legacy of the program with a variety of scholars.

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