McNay Art Museum

Slideshow: Brush Up Your Shakespeare

Apr 24, 2015
Collection of the McNay Art Museum, Gift of the artist 2012.32.7

There is nothing that says theatre, in the traditional sense, like William Shakespeare. We read his plays while still in school, perhaps see "Romeo and Juliet," or "A Midsummer Night's Dream" played by an amateur theatre troupe. Sometimes, we get our first glimpse of Shakespeare's genius through movies. Sir Laurence Olivier on the big screen, playing "Hamlet," "Richard III," and "Henry V," showed us the dramatic and historical side of Shakespeare. These movies also demonstrated the power of music to enhance the drama. The composer Sir William Walton, led the way.

Who is today's Birthday Bard? Why, it's William Shakespeare! In truth, his birth date is rather hazy. Nevertheless, April 23, 1564, is when the BBC celebrates it, and that's good enough for me. However, to keep all bases covered, his baptism record shows the date April 26th on it.

Collection of the McNay Art Museum, Gift of Robert L. B. Tobin, TL1998.109. / © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ ADAGP, Paris

All the Rage in Paris: Diaghilev's Ballets Russes is currently on display at The McNay. It is a reflection of the richness of The Tobin Collection of Theatre Arts and the keen eye of Tobin curator Jody Blake. The exhibition reflects one of the most fertile artistic experiments ever, the 20 year residency of Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes in Paris.

The Tobin Collection of Theatre Arts, at San Antonio's McNay Art Museum, is regarded by many to be the most important collection of its kind in the country. In addition to the thousands of volumes of rare and essential books, there are thousands more pieces of visual art in the form of costume, scene, and stage designs, most of them with a musical pedigree. How did such a collection come about? Tobin Collection curators Linda Hardberger and Jody Blake give us some clues.

Watch the video slide show here:

A Gift Of Art From Two Philanthropic Giants

Mar 27, 2015
James Baker

As I walked out of San Antonio's McNay Museum of Art this morning, after a wonderful interview with Linda Hardberger, I felt as though I were swimming upstream against an unstoppable current of children. They were there to tour the McNay's current exhibition of pieces from the Tobin Collection of Theatre Arts. I had only moments earlier been speaking to Mrs.

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