Whoever wins this presidential election will have a lot of big decisions to make within their first year in office. One of those decisions is what to do about states, like Texas, that haven’t expanded Medicaid to more low income people under the Affordable Care Act.

From Texas Standard:

It all started with a battle over information: In one corner was the Texas Health and Human Services Commission. In the other were Texas lawmakers.

The commission holds the details of the state’s Medicaid contracts with large pharmaceutical companies, which show how much the state is spending on medicine. The commission assured lawmakers the state is getting a good deal, but the legislators wanted to see for themselves. In particular, they wanted to know the amount the state was getting back in rebates for name-brand medicine.


Ryan Poppe

State lawmakers are hearing from the families of children with disabilities.  Families are worried some lawmakers want to cut the rates paid to therapists and now that service may be lost.

Boerne grandmother Bonnie Franzen says it’s expensive to care for children like her grandson who was diagnosed with cytomegalovirus at birth.  

“They’ll have hearing loss or total deafness, blindness, cerebral palsy, developmental delays, organ issues, you name it, it affects them," Franzen explains.

From Texas Standard:

Anyone who does regular grocery shopping knows that in many cases, you pay for the name. From bologna to fabric softener, it’s usually cheaper to go with the generic over the name-brand.

That adage is definitely true with prescription medicine.

The Texas Tribune