Medicaid

Ryan Poppe

State lawmakers are hearing from the families of children with disabilities.  Families are worried some lawmakers want to cut the rates paid to therapists and now that service may be lost.

Boerne grandmother Bonnie Franzen says it’s expensive to care for children like her grandson who was diagnosed with cytomegalovirus at birth.  

“They’ll have hearing loss or total deafness, blindness, cerebral palsy, developmental delays, organ issues, you name it, it affects them," Franzen explains.

From Texas Standard:

Anyone who does regular grocery shopping knows that in many cases, you pay for the name. From bologna to fabric softener, it’s usually cheaper to go with the generic over the name-brand.

That adage is definitely true with prescription medicine.

The Texas Tribune


Texas lawmakers are debating the future of the state’s Medicaid program and looking at ways to cut services and costs. But a bigger question looms in the discussion: will a major chunk of the money even be there next year?

From the Here & Now contributor newtork, KUT’s Ashley Lopez reports.

For decades, if people on Medicaid wanted to get treatment for drug or alcohol addiction, they almost always had to rely solely on money from state and local sources.

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