medical marijuana

Ryan Poppe

UPDATED 6:02 p.m.

There are plenty of products sold in Texas with cannabidiol — or CBD — listed as their main ingredient. CBD is seemingly everywhere these days, from the local pharmacy to coffee houses. But Texas health officials plan to ban these products if they are not sold by one of three dispensaries set up by the state.


DEA

As the opioid crisis worsens, more Americans are looking toward alternative sources of pain relief, one of which is marijuana. Cannabis has been reported to alleviate pain and anxiety, and may benefit glaucoma and epilepsy patients.

By the time Ann Marie Owen, 61, turned to marijuana to treat her pain, she was struggling to walk and talk. She was also hallucinating.

For four years, her doctor prescribed a wide range of opioids for transverse myelitis, a debilitating disease that caused pain, muscle weakness and paralysis.

The drugs not only failed to ease her symptoms, they hooked her.

When her home state of New York legalized marijuana for the treatment of select medical ailments, Owens decided it was time to swap pills for pot. But her doctors refused to help.

WikiCommons

A state advisory council says when lawmakers assemble for the 2019 legislative session, they should expand Texas medical marijuana policy to include more medical conditions and elements of the plant.

 

 


U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency

The White House is back in the legal spotlight this week. The family of a 12-year-old Texas girl being treated with medical marijuana in Colorado is among a group of plaintiffs suing the Trump administration in an effort to legalize medical marijuana at the federal level.


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