Mexico Drug War

Kainaz Amaria / NPR

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Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

In Mexico last month, the capture of the world's most wanted drug lord, Joaquin Guzman, was a shot in the arm to the country's war on drug trafficking. But that war is not over, not even close. And nowhere is that more evident than in the western state of Michoacan. Residents there say the local authorities are doing nothing to stop the drug cartels. So they're taking up arms by the thousands to do it themselves.

Drug cartel leader Joaquin Guzman, known as "El Chapo," was formally charged on Monday with violating drug trafficking laws in Mexico. While officials celebrate his capture, many in his home state of Sinaloa — who viewed the kingpin as a helper of the poor and a keeper of the peace — are not as pleased.

Notorious Mexican Drug Trafficker Arrested

Feb 22, 2014

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

Mexican officials have captured that country's number one drug trafficker, Joaquin Guzman, also known as El Chapo. The announcement was made this afternoon by Mexico's attorney general who says the head of the feared Sinaloa Cartel was arrested by special marine forces without a single shot being fired.

We're joined now by NPR's Carrie Kahn in Mexico City. Carrie, they've been looking for Guzman for 13 years. How did they capture him?

Lorne Matalon / Fronteras

Fronteras: More Mexicans are trying to escape intimidation and/or violence by petitioning the U.S. for political asylum. Human trafficking is a growing problem in the Southwestern United States. Authorities in Juárez are finalizing their investigation into the cause of a deadly explosion at a candy factory last month. The McDonald Observatory in West Texas is now home to the historic Otto Struve telescope.

Mexican Political Asylum Requests Up

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